The best Gary Larson-inspired analogy for Brexit I could find.

Here’s an audio version of this post:

(Apologies for the atrocious language in this blog but sometimes no other word will do. If you’re a child reading this, back away now. If you’re offended by strong opinions and – as previously mentioned – foul language, read no further. It will do you no good to proceed. And please don’t leave a comment complaining because honestly mate, you’ve been warned).

Today my country is going to begin the lengthy process of fucking itself right the fuck over.

Theresa May, our unelected prime minister has opted to trigger Article 50 after an advisory referendum peddled on lies, to begin the process of the UK leaving the EU. Well, I say the UK but I’m not even sure what that means any more. Will Northern Ireland and its desperately important border be part of these sceptred isles? Scotland? Trafford?? Who fucking knows? Theresa bloody doesn’t.

But Ms May along with her spineless acolytes has determined that leaving the EU is ‘the will of the people.’ What a load of bollocks. (Apart from Kenneth Clarke. Just listen to this speech. Go on).

On 23rd June 2016 we were asked a ludicrously banal binary question. To leave the EU or stay in it? Two boxes, one tick. There was no manifesto. The two scenarios were not fully explained. We, the electorate, were told nothing about what would happen if we opted to leave. The consequences of the loss of EU grants to Cornwall, Wales and (for instance) agriculture, cancer research, the arts, education and infrastructure etc etc weren’t clearly communicated. If they were, I don’t believe people would have bloody voted for it. Because without EU money, huge parts of Britain are fucked. But no, we had Boris Johnson and his massive egregious bus slogan promising – but were they REALLY promising, Reader, because they were terribly coy about it afterwards – to spend £350 million a week on the NHS, should we leave. To many, that was a no-brainer. Pay for a bunch of politicians and civil servants to toss themselves senseless in Brussels or fund Granny’s hip op.

People were conned.

The referendum was advisory.

16 – 18 year olds weren’t allowed to vote on the single biggest issue to affect their future.

And you tell me this was a democratic vote? Fuck off.

The baby boomers – the generation who got the best of Britain during the slow decline of the second Elizabethan age – have fucked us. With their selfish, jingoistic moaning about sinister Muslims, Polish fruit pickers and how the Empire was won when there wasn’t even such a thing as the Internets, they have fucked us.

Weirdly, the people most concerned about immigration voted to leave in areas least affected by immigration.

There was much table banging about Project Fear and how facts explaining the dire economic, social and legal consequences of leaving the EU were all a hoax. Michael Effing Gove told us we were sick of experts. Well, not me, pal. If I’m going in hospital for a brain op, I’d really rather prefer an expert slice open my cortex, thanks very much. If I’m putting in a tax return, I’d rather my accountant glance over it than a fucking poet. What a ridiculous, populist, STUPID thing to say.

But people bought it. Because these clowns were saying – like Trump – what people *really* wanted to say but were too bound up by social mores to do so. Brexit has made it OK to be racist, xenophobic, mysogynistic and has given many millions license to say appalling things to complete strangers on Twitter. But this is making Britain Great Again, isn’t it??

Of course not all people who voted to Leave are racist. That’s like saying everybody who voted to Remain is passionately, whole-heartedly in favour of every single thing the EU does. Brexit has given racists license to spread their hate. Why else have we seen a spike in hate crimes since the referendum?

There was lofty talk about ‘sunny uplands’ and in an awful pre-figuring of the lunatic Trump, ‘Britain being Great Again’ and a sense that leaving would fundamentally change the nature and shape of bananas. And we had Nigel Farridge wanking on, doing his ‘regular bloke down the pub‘ schtick, the gruesome counterpoint to Boris Johnson’s mop-headed Churchillian tribute act, telling people the views of ‘the little people’ have been treated with contempt for long enough. As they have. But is an act of colossal self-harm really an appropriate response??

Famously, James O’Brien asked a caller to his programme who had expressed disdain for EU interference in our legal system to name ONE LAW to illustrate his point. He couldn’t. He’d been fed a load of propaganda by appalling newspapers. Because if it’s written in the papers, it’s got to be true, hasn’t it??

The morning after the referendum Johnson and Gove looked like a pair of posh plums who’d put in a joke bid at an auction for a vase they didn’t want and had just been told they’ve got to cough up the billions they’d pledged FOR A LAUGH. They looked fucked and frightened.

Because now, if we plough on with Article 50 to its terrible, dystopian conclusion, we won’t be able to live, work, love or study in Europe in quite the same way ever again. (If you want to learn more about what leaving the EU might mean in practice, I recommend Ian Dunt’s book. In fact, just the opening pages of it will do. Go on, read them using Amazon’s convenient ‘look inside’ feature).

And just last week, when Nicola Sturgeon mooted the second indy ref for Scotland, Theresa May had the BARE FACED GALL to suggest that this was an act of seismic daftness because this means Scotland would be turning its back on its biggest neighbouring trading partner. Well, HELLO?? WTF is Europe to the UK if it’s not its biggest neighbouring trading fucking partner??

This referendum was won by populist papers appealing to prejudices and rage. They exploited the people living in communities who suffered under Osborne’s austerity. And now we’re told BY EXPERTS that these communities – the communities who voted most strongly to leave – will suffer the most after Brexit.

I believe that instead of leaving, we need to negotiate a new Treaty with the EU. We don’t need a divorce from the EU. We need mediation and a helluva lot of counselling. But leaving – like this – because of such lies, with no plan, not enough civil servants to cope with the workload and a dire lack of trained negotiators, will mean we’re likely to be fucked. And fucked – forgive me, Mother – right up the arse.

This, at least, is my view.

The vote was “won” because only 48% of the population wanted to Remain. Wow. Only 48%. What a terribly *low proportion* of Britons that is. So now, because the official Opposition party has all the punch and conviction of a blancmange, 16 million British voters are being fucked over. Their views – in this amazingly democratic referendum – don’t matter. The views of the 48% have been fucked right off.

For fuck’s sake.

(If you want to find out more, you could do worse than reading these articles by Nick Clegg. If you can bring yourself to forgive him over tuition fees, you’ll see that the man talks sense. Him and Kenneth Clarke, to whom, I am convinced, I am somehow almost certainly related).

Today there is a monumental effort on the part of the press to convince people that triggering Article 50 is the point of no-return. It isn’t. And here’s why. Thanks to the Good Law Project, there is a chance that a truly democratic vote *could* succeed. If you really care about democracy and everything that brings, now’s your chance to prove it. How? Just get involved. Use your voice.

To find out more about me and my work, click here.

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Comment on Peter

  • Rod Taylor

    I agree with every single word & have a good many more stored up inside for another day! This will only be a “done deal” if people don’t put up a fight for something better. There is a long way to travel with many negotiations to be conducted, which may well change the look of the future for those who saw it very simplistically. Those leading the UK negotiations will most certainly be no match for the bombardment they will be getting from all sides as time goes on & those opposed to Brexit would be well advised to be pro-active & creative in preparing sound counter policies & plans which shout loudly from the rooftops & not just complain about what is happening! Target the young because they are the guardians of the future – trust them, it’s their world we’re entering! Talk to current EU countries to find possible new common ground for the future – they don’t want this either so will possibly be more agreeable to a different solution than a break-up! The fat lady isn’t singing yet!!!! A disillusioned baby boomer (we’re not all to blame).

    March 29, 2017 at 11:09 am
    • Elaine Tavner

      Totally agree with Emma’s great blog and the replies….I feel so bitter and angry about Brexit as a Baby Boomer. What a mess we’ve made of things after having had so many advantages in our lives plus of course not having to be conscripted into a European war like my dad was. I only hope that, as Brexit goes tits up and our generation dies out, the young have a chance of salvaging a decent life from this appalling mess we have created.

      March 30, 2017 at 9:00 am
    • Adrienne C

      Point well made! Blaming baby boomers is fruitless. If we have a real democracy the only people to blame for this unholy mess are the 13,000,000 eligible voters who couldn’t be arsed to express an opinion one way or another! Plus, of course, appeaser May’s predecessor who took us to a referendum on the single most important decision in 40 years with the outcome decided by a simple majority. All nations who use referenda regularly (like Switzerland) require at least 51% of all eligible voters to support the proposal. On June 23rd Brexit was 6,304,259 votes short of 51% AND, I’m sorry to say around a quarter of those who didn’t vote were in the 18-30 age group!

      March 30, 2017 at 9:35 pm
      • Ann

        Yes because they thought it was a done deal and and couldn’t be bothered to ‘get out of bed’. I am a babyboomer and the chance now to have access to the rest of the world’s markets must be worth working for. UK doesn’t have trade negotiators now, because they haven’t had too, it was all done for them. Brussels has ruled since 1976 and UK has got lazy, now they have to wake up and work for themselves and the country, surely that is worth doing …..isn’t it????. Successive governments have just pandered to Brussels and frittered money. Maybe farming will make a comeback instead of selling farms or telling farmers they can’t plant fields because the EEC won’t allow them to to protect European farmers. Countries that were axed from trading with Uk after it went into “The Common Market” like New Zealand, Australia, South Africa had to go and find new markets, how do you think they felt to be told that “The Common Market” didn’t want their produce any longer, and this they have done, and now hopefully trade can again begin with these countries. Also leaving the EU, and the controversy it has caused just shows who was propping up the EU along with Germany …….the UK, just watch and see how many European countries now begin to falter. STOP BLAMING US BABYBOOMERS……. give yourself more credence and more good than sitting their ranting, put your effort into actually physically doing something positive. I am sure you are an intelligent person. Seems to me that you all want this to ‘fail’, so you can say ‘told you so’.

        March 31, 2017 at 1:51 am
        • Carsten Sandkämper

          “…instead of selling farms or telling farmers they can’t plant fields because the EEC won’t allow them to protect European farmers…” I am sure you have a source for this ludicrous claim, right?

          It is true that agricultural subsidies from the EU largely went to big agricutural companies rather than small farming communities (because you apply for subsidies according to the size of your farmland – one of the EU rules that needs reforming – see? we are capable of constructive criticism… who’d have thought?), but even if that means a disbalance in support, there will be a huge financial gap once the money from the EU is scrapped. And do you really expect Westminster to shift the money they don’t have to pay into the EU budget anymore into agriculture the same way the EU did? Seeing that due to a suspected shortage in farmhands and skilled workers from outside the UK (in some cases 50% of the workforce) farmers will be in freefall quite soon? How’s that for “something positive”?

          You can try to sugar coat all of this with motivational speech, but realities and facts will not go away.

          March 31, 2017 at 1:08 pm
        • Ann

          Yes it’s true suddenly the UK has a massive job in it’s hands. A job it’s not yet ready for. Surely we should have had a plan in place before deciding to jump into the unknown? We are now looking to employ people from other countries to help rewrite legislation etc.
          The argument re the farmers isn’t necessarily accurate as we don’t know if the UK government will supplement the money currently being given by the EU. Yes, farmers will no longer need to conform to certain regulations but they are in place to enable exports to the EU, which is a very important market for UK farmers.
          As for the UK proping up the EU, we were the 4th biggest contributer not the second. However by percentage of our economy we were the 27th biggest contributer, or in other words the smallest contributer.
          I have to disagree with you as I feel many remainers aren’t simply complaining about the result. They are actively doing what they can to save the country. In fact this blog has links on how to get involved. I couldn’t honestly support leaving the EU knowing there is a strong chance I would be helping sink a sinking ship. I’m still going to look for the lifeboats instead. Out of interest though, how would someone throw their support practically behind the leave campaign to make things work seeing as most of us don’t work in the government?

          March 31, 2017 at 3:55 pm
        • Lindsay

          You concern me. We didn’t stop trading with the rest of the world because we already do that as part of being a member of the EU. Who on earth is Brussels? The capital of Belgium? Or do you mean the place where the EU is headquartered and where the decisions on legislation and policy is made by all 28 member states, including, shockingly, our own government? Really, you need to do some research!

          March 31, 2017 at 4:01 pm
          • Alan

            Please note that Belgium (which you mention) exports more to India than we do. Why do so many people suppose that by leaving the EU we’ll be able to export so much more.

            August 18, 2017 at 1:06 pm
      • Dorscol

        I am a baby Boomer but my husband (12 years younger is not) both of us and our whole families voted to Remain – all that could, one 16 year old couldn’t of course. We now live in France and will overcome all obstacles to being able to stay here. I don’t know where the idea I see expressed later about not being able to trade anywhere in the world but all other Countries have goods available in most of the shops. Although the French prefer local food everything is available here New Zealand lamb, Australian foods kangaroo and ostrich many Chinese and other Asian foods, South and Central American, Canadian (I can only name maple syrup but I am sure they must export something else too). A wide variety of African goods but sadly from North America it is mainly whiskies and Macdonalds. I know this is true of Spain and Italy in the major population areas, obviously less so in the remote country areas but the EU are trading with the world so how can the UK on their own better that? When there are promotions on the prices are not outrageous either, we live quite frugally but eat very well as we like a wide variety of cuisines. Buying things like books the only one I can think of but my husband has found other items he wanted are only available in the US and they will not send out of the Country at all or the postage costs are 5 times the value of the goods

        March 31, 2017 at 4:43 pm
      • tony

        So you all want to be governed by the supper state of germany’s Totally corrupt EU.I just take a look at the state of our streets,and those of spain,then I look at the villages in spain,every village has a swimming pool,an old age pensions,meeting hall providing hot meals every day. OH yes they have clean streets.

        All this with your money,so what did we get in return,we now live in one of the biggest shits holes in the civilised world,NHS,Schools,infrastructure,bankrupt.
        So fuck you lot I am of to Spain!!.Oh and by the way my forefathers sacrificed their youth for the young to keep bleating on about how hard life is for them.just what have they sacrificed for this country -UCK ALL at the last count.
        Tony C.

        November 24, 2017 at 5:45 pm
        • Emma

          “Supper state”? Count me IN!

          Still, you seem really nice. That’s probably because of all the good cheer you feel, you know, what with having benefited from free university education, affordable housing, cheaper food…

          November 24, 2017 at 5:52 pm
          • Fed up

            Lost all
            Of that due to being part of the eu you moron! Fuck me your thick!

            December 8, 2017 at 10:48 am
          • Emma

            It’s “Fuck me you’re thick.”

            December 8, 2017 at 10:50 am
          • Fed up

            No I meant to put “your” as you own the condition of stupidity. And by commenting back with your correction proves a point!

            We have lost so much since joining the EU, hopefully we can start getting that back and maybe try erase the brainwashing people like you have been under from the media and to use actual critical Thinking maybe actually go out beyond your little towns and take in the realities.

            Ah well We are leaving the dictatorship of the EU now so all redundant. Maybe one day you will wake up. Probably not but ah well.

            December 8, 2017 at 11:10 am
          • Emma

            “You own the condition of stupidity.”

            Sounds like a Morrissey lyric.

            Still, as I say (allowing all your barmy abuse to bounce off my hide-like skin) you go carefully. And I really hope you cheer up soon, Fed up.

            December 8, 2017 at 11:13 am
    • Mea Culpatia

      This article is fantastic as are the comments.

      It gives me great delight to read such raw unbalanced emotion, I feed on your rage and tears. Reading this is nearly as good as waking up on the 24th June 2016.

      But don’t worry too much, the sane have got this covered, the EU is a redundant entity to anyone who cared to look, so getting out of the EU was the only sane thing to do and in a few years you will, if you are capable of any self awareness, look back and see you were just too dramatic and wrong headed. It will all be fine, so dry your eyes and try to calm yourselves.

      March 31, 2017 at 3:26 pm
    • Laurence

      “I’m a Brexiteer”, to the tune of Monty Python’s “I’m a Lumberjack”. Incomplete as yet – obviously requires some talented input. https://t.co/wNMlSSFV1Y

      October 11, 2017 at 11:28 am
    • Fed up

      Wow just wow you are all (including the writer of this post!) just fucking retarded! You have no idea of reality and live in your regressive mind set! People voted to get out (and out mean completely go to WTO, do not pay a single penny more in to and deport any undesirable forthwith!) of the corrupt life destroying Dictatorship called the EU it was not an advisory referendum it was a chance to put right one of the biggest lies of the century by the scum bag known as heath! Absolutely every point you have put across is just made up left wing nonsense! 16-18 year olds voting? WTF no! Most 20’s people haven’t a clue this group can nearly dress them selves and have no clue in reality! The vote was based on what has been observed not what was written In the media! Firstly the who hang up free trade! Ffs are your all really that fuckig retarded that you don’t get it’s not free! We pre-pay regardless of whether we want to buy imported goods or not!? Secondly do you not see that we are also subsidising the imported goods basically crushing our own production (manufacturing, farming, fishing…etc) hence why we have hardly any industries now, due to not being able to compete with subsidised imports! Ah but you people don’t deal with facts you deal with made up nonsense the stuff your fed (kind of like religion) that you believe so much you fight for your own demise!

      No treaty other than a standard one needs to be made! Millions of draining EU nationals need to be sent back, as well as all the “fake” EU nationals (the ones that have got in to the EU gotten a passport and then walked in to the uk!) we need to invest in to our own infrastructure! Oh and also lock up Blair and Brown for illegally signing treaty’s given away our sovereignty and ability to rule our selves! Basically cut all ties with the EU politically. So what if you poor idiotic braindeads soda might have to que up in a different line when going in holiday! Life will carry on the same in fact it will get better!

      Just to add I worked for the DWP round when we first got flooded by millions of migrants, it was like watching an invasion and it’s still going on! But you lot are far to blind to see!

      December 8, 2017 at 7:38 am
      • Emma

        “When we first got flooded by millions of migrants, it was like watching an invasion.”

        Mate, with racist rhetoric like that are you auditioning to get a column in the Daily Mail? Calling me and other remainers “fuckig retarded” [sic] isn’t the best look. Doesn’t make you come across as reasonable. Or convincing. Happy Christmas!

        December 8, 2017 at 8:59 am
        • Fed up

          Thought I would use the so called offending language to best describe you and the other idiots commenting who have no clue what so ever regarding reality! Also well done by using the old racist line! Even though you completely used it in the wrong context! Nothing above I’m my comment is racist! You have shown that you seriously lacking any cognitive or critical thought.

          But I suppose we can’t blame you, you like so many have been brainwashed by schools and the regressive left wing.

          December 8, 2017 at 10:59 am
          • Emma

            At least my school taught me how to spell, mate.

            You go carefully now.

            December 8, 2017 at 11:02 am
          • Fed up

            And again paper thin BS hasn’t been defended because it can’t! Just attack spelling and punctuation etc. Because writing on a phone with predictive text doesn’t produce lots of mistakes! Really shows how pathetic you are. No grip on reality and cany back up anything they say.

            December 8, 2017 at 11:14 am
          • Emma

            Pathetic enough to warrant your time though, eh?

            Look, I’m not wasting my time debating with someone who shows me such little respect and isn’t prepared to respond to politeness in kind.

            And honestly, if you post another nasty, abusive message on this blog, I’ll block you.

            December 8, 2017 at 11:19 am
  • Paul Foulds

    Hello Emma,
    I agree with you about nearly all except that I am a baby boomer, and I’m sure many more of us feel and think exactly the same way as you do!
    Paul.

    March 29, 2017 at 11:39 am
    • Emma

      Good point, well made!

      March 29, 2017 at 11:41 am
      • Rebecca King

        Me too – I tottered round leafleting throughout the referendum with my dodgy baby boomers hip, and marched on Saturday. We need all the unity we can get, and actually it’s a bit hurtful!

        March 30, 2017 at 3:06 am
        • Emma

          I’m sorry Rebecca – so sorry you’re upset. The response I’ve had on my blog from baby boomers is very different to the vibe over on Facebook. Just now an older man has told me to ‘grow up’ and how grateful he is not to be married to me. But you’re right; it’s wrong of me to make blanket statements about baby boomers.

          March 30, 2017 at 6:04 am
          • Darryl

            Not all the sea is blue but by and large it is.

            Not every baby boomer voted out, but as a demographic, by and large they did.

            March 30, 2017 at 9:31 am
        • Jenny Reynolds

          me too but in my case it’s my knee that’s bad

          March 30, 2017 at 10:24 am
          • Neil Tabbers

            And the NHS will fix your knee before you leave this mortal coil. Will the younger generation be so lucky when all the money has been spent?

            April 3, 2017 at 2:30 pm
      • Phil Cox

        brilliant Emma you speak for all the 48% and rising. keep on fighting everyone!!!

        March 30, 2017 at 5:02 pm
      • Conrad Rowlands

        Great blog Emma! I’m sure your mother would excuse your language. Just one slight grate, I don’t know if it was intended or not,where you mention Churchill it’s Farage not Farridge. I’d hate to think of some poor twat being beaten senseless with a giant dildo through mistaken identity because he only shares a name that sounds like our favourite frickin fascist. Keep up the good work!

        March 30, 2017 at 8:46 pm
    • Nigel Capel

      Me, too, and most my friends, but we’re long-time pro-EU types (I’m 66 and I voted “In” in 1975. However, I take issue with the notion that the older generation had all strawberries and cream before the ‘millennials’ arrived. The oldest endured WW2. They and their children helped rebuild a shattered Britain, founded and built the Welfare State, paid higher taxes for the privilege (care for the pre-NHS pensioners and everyone else, education for all and the modernisation of the country’s infrastructure), and did National Service during the ‘hairy’ days of, quite rightly, giving up the Empire. There was also a lot of poverty and there were periods of massive inflation and sky-high interest rates (up to 15%. So, while I agree with your anti-Brexit thesis, I and my fellow ‘baby boomers’ did not have a wonderful time at the expense of millennials.

      March 30, 2017 at 7:50 am
    • Lynn Alderson

      Totally, I’m a baby boomer too and many if us spent our adulthoods fighting for workers and women’s rights a nd the environment. Don’t believe all the guff that we have stolen the next generation’s wealth/futures. It’s a Tory plot to not give this generation the decent pensions our generation fought for. Brexit will undo so much we tried to achieve. Don’t divide the generations against each other.

      March 30, 2017 at 1:40 pm
    • Peter Lewis

      I’m 72, always been a supporter of the European, having lived abroad I fully appreciate the benefits. I agree with every sentiment that Emma has expressed. I dread to think about the damage May & Co are inflicting on the future of Britain.

      March 30, 2017 at 2:29 pm
    • andrew

      Quite – i just checked “includes people who are between 53 and 71 years old in 2017” so that’s me and i for the fuck shit pissing sure would not have voted Leave, but I couldn’t even vote being one of those bloody brits who ‘went native on us’

      Should I ever have to return to England, I’ll swear in French and German, but please – don’t stereo-type baby boomers. my nearest and dearest also fought apartheid, fought for LGBT rights at a time it was illegal, fought on the streets against the National Front, launched the Green agenda, and pushed womens rights in the good direction.

      March 30, 2017 at 3:40 pm
    • Val Jones-Hughes

      Baby boomer too. I woke up the morning after the referendum feeling sick and angry, as did many of my friends. My only point of discontention here. Oh and I’m Welsh, from one of the two counties that voted toe remain. What the rest of the country were thinking is beyond my understanding since we’re surrounded by hulking great signage telling us how many projects in Wales are EU funded!!!

      March 30, 2017 at 8:26 pm
    • Frank Devenney

      I am a baby boomer and have had good life as a European and voted to stay and can’t get my head around why the youth of this country haven’t taken to streets it’s their future the rich elite are screwing with.
      Today we have a nice cynical side show starting to take over media cover Harry’s nuptials talk about being used .When will we stop getting fucked and get out on street in mass and show the rich elite we won’t have our younger generations life ruined just to line their pockets?Get angry get out join movements make the listen to your voice

      November 28, 2017 at 11:11 am
  • Mark

    An entertaining rant! It made me smile and in places sad because we were duped by taking the BREXITers at face value (I didn’t) I’m one of the 48% who said stay. I was on the losing team, in a Yes/No (binary) decision – this can happen.
    By the way – we do not elect a Prime Minister – if you are voting in that way you are duping yourself, so even in less than binary decisions the average UK voter is probably duping themselves …. maybe there should be a question similar to the online ‘am I a robot’ added to elections and referenda along the lines of am I capable to make this decision…. tick the picture of Big Ben. All those selecting a tall tower have their vote discarded. Only those smart enough to tick the picture of a bell are allowed to be counted.

    March 29, 2017 at 11:58 am
  • Paul Oldroyd

    Agree with everything apart from the baby boomers bit. Many of us voted remain, and I’m a bit sick of us all getting tarred with the same brush.

    March 29, 2017 at 12:29 pm
    • Emma

      Fair point, Paul.

      March 29, 2017 at 12:44 pm
    • modicana

      Yes,
      I’m a baby boomer too and I would never have dreamt of voting leave! I’m heartbroken. Otherwise, I agree with every word of the post!

      March 30, 2017 at 5:13 pm
    • LYN HUNTINGTON

      Voted to remain baby boomer too. Born 1951 and 66 now. I object to the baby boomer bit, as I have on many other sites. BUT my biggest objection is the fact that people from 66 to the oldest alive have been put in the same age group and called baby boomers – many of course are not, people born in the 20s and 30s certainly are not baby boomers.

      March 31, 2017 at 9:11 am
    • Philip Ogley

      Unfortunately it’s true. Percentage wise. I would have never given the +65 the vote. Simply because they are (mostly) retired.

      April 1, 2017 at 6:28 pm
  • Zoe

    It definetly wasn’t just baby boomers who voted to leave. A significant number of millenials voted to leave too, it’s a pretty broad stroke to paint ‘the baby boomers’ as this hive mind of Brexiteers who are scared of Muslims and Polish fruit pickers lol.
    As a remainer, I can also see that there are real reasons that people voted leave outside of the fear mongering the media promoted. It’s easier to see it as an us vs them scenario where Brexiteers have screwed us over rather than actually objectively look at why they may have made the decisions they made. The blame lies with the media and the MPs, not the voters.

    March 29, 2017 at 12:41 pm
  • David Wood

    I disagree. For a start, if people didn’t want to leave, then more of them should have got off their backsides and voted. But instead they didn’t bother to register, and many of those who did didnt bother to vote. So all of those didn’t bother, don’t have any right to moan, and bitch about it.
    As for the EU money that will no longer go to Wales and Cornwall, all the EU grants received each year was under 50% of what we pay in each year, so the money will be there. If you are going to claim that this whole situation is based on the lies of the leave campaign, then try getting your facts straight.

    March 29, 2017 at 1:50 pm
    • Emma

      Hi David, thanks for taking the time to comment. I’m not claiming “this whole situation” is based on the lies of the Leave campaign. That would be idiotic and simplistic. The reasons are complex and varied, but the lies of the Leave campaign certainly didn’t help. Nor did some elements of the media. If you follow the links in the article, you’ll see there are many sources…so I have indeed done my best to state facts. Have a good day, Emma

      March 29, 2017 at 1:56 pm
    • Helen

      David – it may well be that the funding received was only 50% of what was paid in (I have no idea if that is the case) and by your reasoning the ‘money is there’. For all of the EUs faults it did force Westminster into funding areas that they otherwise wouldn’t have (i.e. Not ‘The City’) I think you’ll find that the same funding from UK government will not happen for the areas that need it most unfortunately

      March 29, 2017 at 11:04 pm
    • Ian

      For the benefit of David Wood and others that still don’t get it. That is

      ” all the EU grants received each year was under 50% of what we pay in each year, so the money will be there.”

      Here’s an explanation why the money won’t be there.

      The contributions the UK pays for membership isn’t just about what it receives back in grants, the membership fee gives us access to free trade which is worth billions more than we pay in. The £350 million a week we would save is like a market trader selling pies turning over a few thousand a week saying he could save £35 a day if they didn’t pay their stall rent. Of course he/she would then have the freedom to sell door to door. But do you really think they would be better off and have more money to pay the mortgage, the holiday in the sun etc? Or do you think it would be foolish to pack in an established successful business in favour of a business with almost certain decreased turnover and therefore profit?

      March 30, 2017 at 4:49 am
      • R. Marshall

        Wish there were a ‘like’ button here!!

        March 30, 2017 at 3:28 pm
      • Matt

        Actually that’s not true at all, it is cheaper for the consumer outside of the EU and the common market,because of the EU VAT added on top of everything we buy (which then goes straight to the EU coffers) and also the extra taxes added on things if we want to buy from outside of the EU when we try to buy anything.

        The common market is tiny compared to the rest of the world and has less competition so generally everything is cheaper outside of the EU then in the common market, if you actually go look online then remove the added taxes the EU imposes.

        March 30, 2017 at 5:51 pm
      • Anne Greaves

        Well said!

        March 30, 2017 at 7:37 pm
  • Chris Atkinson-Price

    I agree with most of what you have to say, Emma, and I feel in equal amounts sad and angry about the place we find ourselves in. I am pleased that you have stressed that Article 50 is NOT the end of the road – so many people believe this and I spend a lot of time trying to persuade these people that it is still worth fighting.

    I think I may be even older than the baby boomers, and I didn’t vote for anything, because I have been living outside the UK for over 15 years. Like the 16 to 18 year olds and EU citizens in the UK, I stand to suffer a lot from Brexit but was not given a voice. But if I had been able to vote, I would certainly have voted Remain. And I will keep fighting.

    March 29, 2017 at 2:22 pm
  • Mike

    “Weirdly, the people most concerned about immigration voted to leave in areas least affected by immigration.”

    It takes just 6 years to no longer be classed as an Immigrant but as a UK citizen, the areas most affected by immigration will have had a large number of people who used to be classed as an immigrant able to vote, this will have effected the results.

    March 29, 2017 at 4:18 pm
    • Emma

      Thanks for this, Mike. Do you have any data to back this theory up? The link in the article about this point has some very clear stats: https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/24/voting-details-show-immigration-fears-were-paradoxical-but-decisive

      March 29, 2017 at 4:27 pm
    • Fatima

      Mike I am struggling to understand your statement. Are you saying that the areas most affected by immigration had all the migrants applying to become British citizens (as there is no magic conversion from migrant to voter after 6 years) and then in turn voting for the UK to Leave? Doesn’t make any sense does it?

      March 30, 2017 at 11:46 am
    • Owain

      You’re very wrong about that Mike as most EU migrants do not choose to take up UK citizenship, some even if they are here for decades. So every one of these migrants unless they took UK citizenship were not allowed to vote in the referendum.

      He truth is that despite the reality telling you otherwise, public services not overly stressed by immigration, enough people felt like immigration was to blame for their poor hospitals, crowded schools etc. Areas less affected by immigration spot the strange language being spoken on the bus and take issue with it. Where as for the rest of us it’s part and parcel of normal life.

      Migrants are net contributors, many of which will have paid more tax in their short stays with us than some who voted leave will pay in a lifetime. But there’s no telling people in these leave areas not affected by immigration, they see it, they feel it, they know it must be true.

      March 30, 2017 at 11:50 am
    • Natasha

      That is absolutely untrue! You confuse residency and citizenship! You don’t seen to understand that there are many EU residents that cannot take British citizenship because they cannot have dual nationality, like the British can. My Dutch parents live in the UK since 1987. They worked in the Netherlands and Britain foto a Dutch company untill their pension. They did up a delapidated house in the depth of Wales, and have always been pillers of their local community and have never burdoned the UK with any costs: they payed their way in full in taxes and rates. They need to keep their Dutch citizenship because otherwise they Will lose the (Dutch state) pension they worked for for over 45 years, and also they might want to come back to Holland at the end of their life. Their resident non national status was never a problem because EU. But THEY COULD NOT VOTE in this!

      March 30, 2017 at 2:54 pm
      • Cornelia Hughes

        I agree! I have American and Dutch friends who also couldn’t vote. I am also a baby boomer, but agree with everything you say, Emma. I live in Scotland, and just feel plain disenfranchised. So frustrated and angry…all the surge in hate crimes, and the rise of ‘we can get our values back’! Precisely what values had we lost? Unequal pay, the ability to trash our environment? Grrr

        April 1, 2017 at 8:37 am
    • R. Marshall

      Also – on R4 this morning, a lady who has lived here for years, but cannot (she was, I believe, a carer) afford the £5,000 it would cost for naturalisation of all her family here. The document (again on R4) to be filled in is some 85 pages in UK as compared to a few pages in other countries – I believe the speaker stated the Netherlands is two sides (anyone able to correct this if wrong?)

      March 30, 2017 at 3:32 pm
    • MAIRIN VALDEZ

      Part of this is that no one ever defines ‘immigrant’ – do we mean EU workers, non-eu people, asylum seekers, refugees. Is Sunderland full of black and brown faces?

      March 30, 2017 at 5:19 pm
    • Tom

      Epic, epic logical fallacy there Mike.

      March 31, 2017 at 7:11 pm
  • Letitia Smith-Burnett

    I am one of the Babyboomers, how I hate that term! I voted to remain as I also voted to join in 1973. I’ve lived through three day weeks, high interest rates and high inflation and came to see Europe as a force for good: good for scientific cooperation, good for the arts, good for infrastructure and development. But, unless one read widely and not just the right wing press, unless one was educated to question rigorously, we could easily be lead to believe that Europe was undemocratic, overly beaurocratic, the ‘big brother’ who could be blamed for all our ills. Indeed today is a very sad day, and as you rightly point out we must not stop fighting for a reversal of Brexit, it is our duty to do so!

    March 29, 2017 at 4:35 pm
  • Pauline Murray

    Just about the right number of expletives for the anger I have been feeling since the June debacle. I feel as if I have been living in the middle of some ghastly gothic pantomime. Surely common sense must prevail eventually?

    March 29, 2017 at 4:57 pm
  • Sue Townsin

    Another baby boomer here. I didn’t vote remain because I’ve lived in Ireland for the last 23 years so I was disenfranchised. Obv, if I’d had a vote I would have voted remain so they left me out. Ironically we had begun serious house hunting to return home to the UK – that’s been put on hold until I know where I stand with my tiny pension. So feeling a bit glum today and your energy has cheered me up! Remember those Friday afternoon cars in the bad old days that conked out constantly? The wheels will come off this one for sure.

    March 29, 2017 at 5:34 pm
  • Colin

    Fun and sad to read. Blame all of the leavers for being stupid and racist and all the remainers for being the only true patriots (can you say that for a group of people willing to give up ever greater sovereignty to Brussels?) My vote to leave was indeed about sovereignty but not in James O’Briens childish questions but for doing my own research. I didn’t and don’t blame media for bad news and it was awful. I never trusted them to come at me without an agenda, either side. I did my own research as I reckon that most people did too. To say that others didn’t and cannot have a different view to you is a bad stereotype of a leftist trait. You want to know what The EU is going to look like then look at their plans. They are out there. If you like the look of where they want to take EU countries then be upset, curse, cry that we are out because we are almost fully out now (I know you can demonstrate for the next two years too). If you don’t like their future, and I certainly don’t, then expend your clearly large energy and support your country into making it a country you want it to be.

    March 29, 2017 at 6:16 pm
    • Natasha

      How did you research? What did you read to convince you to vote leave? What EU balances did you read, what EU directives do you feel harmed Britain ?

      March 30, 2017 at 2:58 pm
    • Steve Paget

      I don’t believe that you did your own research. The reason I am doubtful is that even now, as the leaving process is underway, no one seems to know how it’s going to turn out. Even the people at the heart of the process can give us no reassurances about the sort of deal we will get, or whether it will be good for the country. So the idea that the average member of the public could have done the calculations almost a year ago is, frankly, implausible.

      March 31, 2017 at 6:06 pm
  • Jimmy Jama

    I was and am against leaving the EU but we had a referendum and the will of the people has to be respected. It just goes to show that democracy is wasted on the common man.

    1) We elect MPs not the PM so Teressa May was elected

    2) 16 & 17 year-olds aren’t mature enough to vote, I’m sorry but that’s how it is. My daughters are 6 & 9 and I’d argue they are just as badly affected by Brexit but they couldn’t vote either

    3) The referendum was advisory but it would be political suicide to ignore it

    4) Anybody with a brain cell that was even barely clinging onto life knew that the leave campaign was based on lies.

    We are where we are and now we need to ensure that we negotiate the best possible deal for the UK, I fear it will be poor but there you go

    March 29, 2017 at 6:19 pm
    • Anne Greaves

      So we’ve made a disastrous mistake but must continue with it as it would be sooo embarrassing to admit it?

      March 30, 2017 at 7:41 pm
    • Derick Tulloch

      There is a minimum age to vote. 16 in Scotland (the age of majority has always been 16) and 18? In England?

      Perhaps there should also be a maximum age to vote? The older generations have less at stake, and may be catastrophically out of touch with current realities?

      April 2, 2017 at 8:38 am
  • George H. Peters

    Writing this I fear I am intruding in a family argument which is none of my business. Or is it? The following lines are not about politics, but an attempt to explain what Britain means to me.

    Let me introduce myself: I am a 67-year-old German teacher-turned-photographer. At the age of eleven I had my first English lesson, which influenced the rest of my life. Eventually, I studied English and German literature, worked as a foreign language assistant in the Midlands, and for 30 years taught English and German at several grammar schools before I was lucky enough to devote the remains of the day to my great passion: photography.

    All my adult life English literature and British history have played an important role, and looking back I realize how formative that year in Britain has been. Literature and every day life completed the picture I had from Britain, a picture that was far from complete as I learned during the following decades. Most important were the people I met: my landlady, a retired music teacher; my colleagues; the pupils; the chance encounters.

    When I stepped ashore in September 1973, Britain had become a member of the EEC, had introduced the decimal coinage which made it much easier for me, though I loved the sixpence and shilling coins. I shared lodgings with a French student; in fact, Mrs Light had for some time been the landlady of a succession of French and German students.

    I shall never forget Mrs Alice Barker. She was my landlady’s charwoman, as they were then called. Alice and her husband David had no children of their own. François and I were soon visiting them for long chats by the open fire, countless cups of tea, and the occasional whisky. It was then that my German name Georg was anglicised to George.

    As George I returned to Germany, resumed my studies, became a teacher. Fortunately, there are many British expats in Kiel and Hamburg, even Australians, so there is enough contact with the English-speaking world, not excluding visitors from the USA. Finally, the Internet changed the world to McLuhan’s global Village, with all the advantages and disadvantages.

    Today we seem to have arrived at a historical watershed. Britain, or should I say: half of Britain has decided they might be better off outside the European Union. We, your neighbours, have to respect that decision. You will have to weather many a storm in the next two years and I wish you a safe voyage and a happy return. Don’t be strangers.

    Personally, I’d like to express my gratitude for everything Britain has given me. It is a privilege to be a guest in the English language. I leave the last word to Ian Kershaw:

    “Out of the ashes, against all probabilities, a new Europe, divided within itself but with each part soon resting on more solid foundations than had ever seemed likely at the end of the war, had with remarkable speed taken distinct shape. The future lay open. But amid the lasting scars, physical and moral, of the most terrible war of all time, possibilities were emerging of a more stable and prosperous Europe that could ever have been imagined within living memory, in the decades when the continent had come close to self-destruction.”

    To Hell and Back: Europe 1914-1945 (Penguin Books, 2016)

    March 29, 2017 at 6:38 pm
  • Terry Markwick

    On the morning after the vote an Englishwoman in her 40’s working in a corner shop here in my home town asked me why I was looking down. I said jokingly it was “Brexit Flu!” She said that she better not tell me how she voted then. And then she insisted on telling me!!!!

    She said that she had voted to leave because her Nan had been evacuated from London during the war and her parents were killed in the Blitz. So this lady didn’t want to be ruled by Germans. Hence “Leave.”

    Later that day a Scottish millennial girl also decided to regale me with her reasons for voting “Leave” and she too didn’t like the Germans.

    Now I don’t for a moment think that these two people are fully representative of all Pro Brexit voters, but it worries me tremendously that in 2017 the prejudices of the mid 20th Century are still important to some people. Ironically the EU was created to try to ensure that such prejudices didn’t provoke conflict ever again in Europe.

    March 29, 2017 at 7:29 pm
    • Emily

      Terry – shocking how some British people can’t let that go. We are over seventy years on from the war’s end and as you say the original Common Market, leading eventually to the EU, was a move to prevent future wars on the continent.

      I know WW2 was awful, but the people involved are not the people here today. We’d be the first ones to complain if we were judged for the partition of India and we certainly marched with our “Not in our name” banners during Gulf War 2.

      March 31, 2017 at 9:57 am
  • David

    A beautifully phrased piece of polemic which has brightened my day. Thank you.
    The sadness I feel for the lack of an effective argument for paying into Europe instead of funding the NHS is tempered by the anger I feel that liars are still involved in any form of public life after ‘that bus’.

    March 29, 2017 at 7:42 pm
  • Alan Ingram

    Another baby boomer here. Brexit will ruin all us boomers have tried to achieve over the past 40 years. To think that this has happened on our watch is truly appalling. But the greedy, feckless, racist, xenophobic chancers who put this scam together have nothing to do with us, The criminals have been plotting for years. Their lies will catch them out. As long as we join forces. Our sons and daughters have always held our greatest hopes. We can defeat these crooks. Have faith that we can work togetherto find the solution and that the Europeans will help us. They are as sick of this fiasco as we are.

    March 29, 2017 at 8:36 pm
  • Mark Richards

    Very well written piece,I take my hat off to you kind Sir,not only for the rich enlightenment,but mostly for reminding EXACTLY how I felt the day after the Scottish referendum (well and truly shafted). Finest Regards,Mark Richards.

    March 29, 2017 at 9:21 pm
  • Gary John Turnbull

    Wow I’ve got an erection for he first time in 15 years yahoo😂😂😂😂😂😂😂👍👍👍Evening all.

    March 29, 2017 at 11:25 pm
  • Dave Fernig

    The solution is pretty simple, if you can manage it and not all can. Get out of this country, and be free of its class system, corruption and weird (because the evidence points in the opposite direction) superiority complex.
    So Leave.
    If you able. If not, it isn’t going to be fun. I always thought the most apt comparison is Argentina, 9th world economy pre WWI, then decline into a basket case.

    March 29, 2017 at 11:35 pm
    • Derick Tulloch

      1 Move to Scotland
      2 work for and vote Yes to dissolve the UK, either in #Scotref or if that is blocked, in a General Election for a direct move to independence.
      3 Become a Scottish citizen by being resident in Scotland at the date of independence.
      4 Live happily ever after in a social democratic nation that looks to Scandinavia, not Alabama, as a model. It’s likely we will rejoin the single market via EEA/EFTA first.

      I’m not joking guys. Seriously – look into it. See the Phantom Powergilms ‘Journey to Yes’ on YouTube. Particularly No9 Mark

      We’ll do a prisoner exchange at Gretna. Swop delusional Brexiters for normal humans

      Disclaimer. SNP member here.

      April 1, 2017 at 6:13 pm
  • Paul Godman

    This is the ultimate game of divide and rule. We are heading to a one party state with no opposition and no moderating influence of Europe. The rich will get richer and the poor will get poorer. The society that Thatcher tried to destroy will be destroyed totally to be replaced by hate, greed and lawlessness.
    What on earth will happen to peace in Ireland?

    March 29, 2017 at 11:51 pm
  • Jan Smit

    This Yes Minister fragment goes around in Europe: https://youtu.be/37iHSwA1SwE

    A weak and unstable Europe will be damaging for the UK in any case. That should have been also a consideration to remain.

    March 30, 2017 at 2:00 am
  • Steve

    Well I’m with Tony Benn, Arthur Scargill, Hugh Gaitskell and Jeremy Corbyn on this one. We should never have joined this club in the first place. De Gaulle was correct to refuse us!

    March 30, 2017 at 2:11 am
    • Emily

      Steve – yes, my boomer dad would completely agree with you and as a member of the Workers’ Revolutionary Party he voted out in 1975. And he confessed he would’ve voted to leave this time, but he was thinking that such a vote would disadvantage his children and grandchildren’s future chances and so chose remain.

      March 31, 2017 at 10:07 am
  • Troy Johnston

    Hi Emma,
    Fucking love this blog piece.
    And for the Baby Boomers complaining that the Baby Boomers are getting all the blame, the stats according to the governments own website on the matter state that of voters 50yrs+ approx 60-64% voted to Leave, while Millennials (18-24yrs) 71% vote Remain. Source info: https://yougov.co.uk/news/2016/06/27/how-britain-voted/
    People can try to draw their own conclusions about who fucked who with this data!
    Cheers!

    March 30, 2017 at 2:19 am
  • Christine

    Thanks for writing this Emma. Very sad day. I hope your voice gets heard. Bises. Christine

    March 30, 2017 at 5:21 am
  • Trevor Nichols

    Trevor Brilliant but heartbreaking piece – I’m a baby boomer who for the last nine months has felt ashamed of my country. But in a strange way your article Emma and the majority of replies you’ve had give me hope for the future!

    March 30, 2017 at 6:54 am
  • Katie

    This sums it up brilliantly and the swearing is absolutely vital because we’re all so bloody angry and will be until this mess is sorted out. Great piece Emma, Katie

    March 30, 2017 at 7:02 am
  • Jeni E

    Great piece! (Though I am over 60 and very pro EU!)
    If only the electorate had done their homework! So many fell for the lies, and I am convinced that many of those who didn’t vote were too confused by the campaign and thought they’d leave it to those who understood it better! The issues involved were far too complex for most people to understand. I am lucky to live near Vince Cable (the best MP this area ever had!) and sought his advice. My constituency voted firmly to remain, but tragically our new Tory MP (not my choice!!) has failed to represent this in Parliament and has toed the Tory line, dragging us down! Fight on! We cannot allow this madness to wreck this once proudly diverse nation!

    March 30, 2017 at 7:36 am
  • hippogriff169

    I agree. Rod is also righthe when he says it will only happen if we let it happen. I am looking for people with ideas. If you want to help, come and say ‘hi’.
    @hippogriff169

    March 30, 2017 at 7:41 am
  • Mary Murray

    A great piece! Please, do not lump all the baby boomers together. I am one and I am horrified at the thoughts of Brexit, not for me but for my children and grandchildren.
    This Tory government cares not a jot for anyone except themselves and their moneyed pals. This is going to end very badly for the country.

    March 30, 2017 at 8:00 am
  • TeeJayEf

    At the outset of the referendum we were let down by ‘the Government of the time'(in this case the Tories). The Government should have tasked it’s civil servants, as non-political participants, to prepare the facts and scenarios for the public. This way we may have avoided Boris’s bus and all the other crap that flew about at the time. What we got was lazy politics and a public also too lazy to think for itself or who were unable to fathom out what were the realities. You are right about Gove and Johnson the day after the result, not only did they look scared they also ran for the hills (but as usual Boris wasn’t quick enough or so so ‘Public School’that he really does believe he is right.
    Your comment on baby boomers also falls into the category of a ‘lazy’ label (or insult), it’s not my fault that I was born when I was or that I was part of society where the rules and expectations were different.I voted to stay and will continue to be a ‘stayer’. I am vexed by my belief in democracy and what should or can happen now, a second chance seems a great idea at the moment!
    I would stay in Europe but take on the role of leading fundamental change within the EU organisation so that we a ‘salad with all the individual bits adding to the whole rather than a soup’
    ‘Nuff Said

    March 30, 2017 at 8:07 am
  • Lizzie

    Of course you are right in everything you say. But ….

    I believe we can defeat this and I don’t even think it even needs a new EU treaty. However, we do need to face up to the fact that there are real issues facing people in this country which have not been addressed by the political establishment in any meaningful way for years. These have been allowed to fester away until along comes the Leave campaign with a message that leaving the EU will solve all the problems. Job done.

    The problems are not underlying racism or dreams of an empire, but they may well be:

    – the tottering NHS
    – the lack of control, or ability to influence/have a say, felt by large sections of the population.
    – immigration … but not immigration. For 30 years we have moved to a low wage economy for unskilled or manual work, while at the same time shrinking the opportunities for that sort of labour. We have reached a point where people who want to pay rent and raise a family cannot do so on the wages on offer. Hence the need for an itinerant immigrant workforce who can take advantage of the jobs because of the cost of living disparity between the U.K. and other states. Successive governments have relied on this, and that is why they haven’t used the existing EU laws to limit immigration, where other nations in the union, like Belgium, have.
    – the country is broke. People don’t expect to go into Tesco, grab a loaf of bread and walk out without paying, but they do expect roads to be mended, education and social care to be provided, the forces to protect us etc etc etc without paying for it. That is what taxes are for, and everyone, rich or poor plus companies trading here need to pay their fair share, each according to their means.

    All these are real problems and people were told the EU WAS TO BLAME AND BREXIT WOULD SOLVE THEM.

    We, and an increasing number of Leave voters know this was a complete fallacy … but to defeat the campaign we need to come together behind a unified political force with real alternative policies which can and would tackle these issues.

    This is difficult but doable, and if we face up to the challenge together in the coming weeks, we can kick this nonsense into touch, but first we have to realise that BREXIT IS NOT ABOUT EUROPE, it’s about the issues that people face on an everyday basis.

    March 30, 2017 at 8:46 am
    • Emma

      Absolutely agree. A cross-party coalition would be a start. I hope it happens. Eventually, I believe it will. But it’ll take great courage on the part of the politicians. Courage which hasn’t been much in evidence.

      March 30, 2017 at 9:01 am
  • Simon Williams

    Brexit makes me swear like a sailor on a daily basis so no offence taken there. It’s completely understandable when we are having common sense, facts, caution, reasoned argument, honour etc, etc, etc bulldozed out of the way by the tyranny of far right fantasies, using Theresea May as a foil, who is starting to look like she is whithering away under the strain. Nobody would of voted for a power grab by some over privileged posh boys whose intention was to fulfil their predatory capitalist wank fantasy, if that had been on the ballot card. Where was the manifesto that detailed what leaving meant? It’s pure carte blanche for the darker side of our national psyche. Yet much of the great unwashed have extraordinary confidence in the quixotic ambitions of these Dr. Brexitsteins.

    March 30, 2017 at 9:08 am
  • Paolo Sammut

    This is a fantastic piece and I agree with every word here. Thank you for expressing it so eloquently.

    March 30, 2017 at 10:00 am
  • Arwen

    Well written I agree. Change the baby boomer bit my parents are of that generation but old hippies and voted remain. I think more needs to be made of the fact that it was only a 4% majority and why didn’t it need a for the winning side to gain 60% of the vote as the Scottish referendum did?!? Also the fact that Europeans working and paying tax in the U.K. And British expats living in Europe should have been given a vote as it directly affects them!
    On a positive every day a Brexiteer dies a remainer is born.

    March 30, 2017 at 10:36 am
  • David Stone

    As a 59 year old and a baby boomer just, I voted to stay, mainly because we were not told the full implication of leaving, the arguements were too wishy washy not convincing no meat! even the stay side were a bit limp thinking we all new what the EU was about and what it did for us. it transpires not many people did know what the EU did for us, or even how the Uk had voted in any of the major issues debated by the EU parliament, or what it meant to obstain or not vote for an issue. There was a higher than average turnout for the vote 72.2% of 46,501,421 people elidable to vote thats 33,574,025 people that actualy voted leaving nearly 13 million people that didn’t even bother to vote on probably the biggest issue in thier life time and the one that will effect future generations the most.
    Standing politicians don’t have to worry, their tenure is short term 5 years at most, they don’t actually have to thing past that, unless they are worried about the way history will remember them.
    Should it even be just one party that has the responsibility of taking us out? If anyone reads this I’ll let you debate that!
    For all those baby boomers who voted to leave, to get back their country, we didn’t fight to give it away to all those horrid europeans, you should have thought a little further…..now we are in the sh*t with low shoes and there ARE crocodiles about, those horrid Europeans hoping we will fail and have to give them large amounts of our hard earned dosh…..stick it to them Terresa May.
    Well leave we must so lets make the best of it, lets fight for THIS now the best way us Brits know how, in tough times the best rise to the top, so lets hope thats true again, and we don’t go down with a wimper, which I’m sure we won’t.
    Thank you.

    March 30, 2017 at 10:42 am
  • Lesley Bennett

    The government amended the rules on striking: a strike is only allowed if 40% of eligible voting members vote for it. Only 37% of eligible voters voted for Brexit. . . They should have made constitutional amendments fair for working people too.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-legislation-to-make-strike-laws-fair-for-working-people

    March 30, 2017 at 10:52 am
  • IAN FOSTER

    Emma,
    I’m 70. Have worked in other European countries for most of my life! I would have voted Remain if like any other demovratic EU country I had been allowed to vote for the Parliament of my coutry until I died!
    I am as angry as you! I agree with most of your points! Why did you bring baby boomets into this?!
    You/we are forgetting the important principles of this:
    1. Politcians, particularly the Tories, were happy for the referendum to take place, because they didn’t have to make decisions which meant the breaking up of the two main parties. They were far happier with their comfortable life of expenses and pensions whatever happened to their country.
    2. The referendum was an insult to any sincere thinking person!
    3. May continues her pie in the sky lies which will help London and the south esst and further impoverish the ‘Power House of Britain’ AND agricultural regions!
    4. The countries I’ve lived in have had regional governments which have hsd responsibility for budgets and social care, health, education, housing! Regional cities are wealthier and have a better quality lifestyle than those in England, – being supposedly 5th richest in the world! I don’t see this wealth in the regional cities!
    Ian

    March 30, 2017 at 11:05 am
  • Paul Cotton

    It really doesn’t matter what we think or say. Mark Twain said that if voting made any difference they would not allow us to do it. I am a baby boomer and voted to remain as did most of my baby boomer friends. The media were responsible for the outcome as much as anything. Look around you and see how many buy the Mail or The Sun – these poisonous organs should be eliminated, though without them their readers would be rather like headless chickens, not knowing which way to vote. I agree that the younger generation should have had a say in the decision – they will have to live with it.

    March 30, 2017 at 11:07 am
  • Jackie Brook

    I am completely with you on this. A brilliant honest post.
    Thank you

    March 30, 2017 at 11:12 am
  • Tigger

    Would you please SHUT THE FUCK UP about ‘Baby Boomers’ selling Britain down the river!!!

    Not only did I and my friends vote Remain, but most of the people I’ve walked with on all the marches and demonstrations have been my age (70) or even older.

    The way you and others insult us is beyond belief.

    March 30, 2017 at 11:14 am
  • Kevin Quinn

    I am sick of the blame for this being laid at the door of the baby boomers. Neither I nor any of my baby boomer friends voted for this crock of shit. As far as the people I speak to goes, it was the thirty and forty somethings who got us in this mess. I agree the 16-18 year olds should have been allowed to vote and I agree with the rest of this rant, BUT STOP BLAMING ME!

    March 30, 2017 at 11:23 am
    • Emma

      Hey, Kevin it was nothing personal! See my comment below for sources suggesting baby boomer Brexit voting patterns. No offense intended. Sheesh.

      March 30, 2017 at 11:41 am
  • Marta Williamson

    Emma, i so fucking agree with you!

    March 30, 2017 at 12:01 pm
  • Jed

    Great article Emma, spot on.

    March 30, 2017 at 12:03 pm
  • Patricia Cockayne

    I am a Baby Boomer – born 1948. Believe me I voted to Remain Yes I am comfortably off thanks to a working life and although I am a bit of an Anglophile I could see that we are better in than out. It’s no good standing on the sidelines whinging about what’s wrong. Fighting from within the EU is the only way forward. Cameron failed to get a decent deal for us but he should have kept at it. Then when it goes wrong he takes in his ball and we are now “led” by an unelected Prime Minister who couldn’t run a P**s up in a brewery.
    I hope the baby boomer idiots who voted leave are proud of themselves. Talk about “pull up the ladder”!

    March 30, 2017 at 12:11 pm
  • Owain

    I agree with you completely.
    As for swearing I was left disappointed as I was expecting a Malcom Tucker inspired tirade!

    Only a rant like that could come close to how I am feeling.

    I do feel sorry for the baby boomers who have come on here who did not vote to leave. Sadly however although they personally are not responsible their generation largely is. Although turnout was pathetic in the younger demographic. I think enforced voting should have taken place.

    This is turnout

    http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/staggers/2016/06/how-did-different-demographic-groups-vote-eu-referendum

    18-24: 36%
    25-34: 58%
    35-44: 72%
    45-54: 75%
    55-64: 81%
    65+: 83%

    Then here how they voted

    “The most dramatic split is along the lines of education. 70% of voters whose educational attainment is only GCSE or lower voted to Leave, while 68% of voters with a university degree voted to Remain in the EU. Those with A levels and no degree were evenly split, 50% to 50%.

    Age is the other great fault line. Under-25s were more than twice as likely to vote Remain (71%) than Leave (29%). Among over-65s the picture is almost the exact opposite, as 64% of over-65s voted to Leave while only 36% voted to Remain. Among the other age groups, voters aged 24 to 49 narrowly opted for Remain (54%) over leave (46%) while 60% of voters between the ages of 50 and 64 went for Leave.”

    So all age groups under 49 voted to remain!!

    With a far greater size of population the over 49s turning out at over 75%, voted us out.

    I will never get over that statistic it will haunt me forever and will be used to prove to youngsters who is to blame for this mess.

    Yes if they had turned out in greater numbers it would have been closer, maybe even enough. If 16-17 yr olds who will be greatest affected by this had been allowed – forced even to vote then it might have been enough.

    Everyone better turn out in the same numbers come election time is all I can say as if not a significant change is on it’s way.

    March 30, 2017 at 12:12 pm
  • Cathy Simpson

    I’m a baby boomer, and absolutely, totally and utterly deplore the referendum results – and the dreadful effect this is going to have for years to come. I agree with the sentiments expressed in your blog.

    However… one of the worst aspects of this whole debacle is the fact that it’s causing polarisation and division. Let’s not throw ageism, as well as racism and xenophobia into the mix, eh?

    March 30, 2017 at 12:49 pm
    • Emma

      Thanks for this, Cathy. If you read my replies above (below??) you’ll see links to articles giving statistics on Brexit voting patterns of older people. I’m not ageist – I’m just responding to facts! It’s not a personal, petty prejudice.

      March 30, 2017 at 1:04 pm
  • S fitz

    The EU or (Common Market) as it was at first, was brought in by the then government on a “so called” public vote. I’ve not met one person that even voted, never mind agreed to it!!! We were sold down the river at the very beginning, and been sold down the river again! I’m a baby boomer and I didn’t want to leave the EU. I sincerely hope those ‘educated’ idiot’s in power agree to a deal that is FOR the people of the UK,NOT one that would keep them in a great very well paid fiddling job! Obviously ‘they’ didn’t expect the way the so called vote went as they had absolutely no manifesto. As for that lier Johnson, he should be sacked for the things he promised, and he knew it was lies! The whole thing stinks!!!!

    March 30, 2017 at 12:51 pm
  • S fitz

    The EU or (Common Market) as it was at first, was brought in by the then government on a “so called” public vote. I’ve not met one person that even voted, never mind agreed to it!!! We were sold down the river at the very beginning, and been sold down the river again! I’m a “baby boomer” and I didn’t want to leave the EU. I sincerely hope those ‘educated’ idiot’s in power agree to a deal that is FOR the people of the UK,NOT one that would keep them in a great very well paid fiddling job! Obviously ‘they’ didn’t expect the way the so called vote went as they had absolutely no manifesto. As for that lier Johnson, he should be sacked for the things he promised, and he knew it was lies! The whole thing stinks!!!!

    March 30, 2017 at 12:52 pm
  • Prim Maxwell

    I agree with everything apart from the Baby boomers comments as I am one of them and I voted to remain, my view is the referendum was badly managed for the following reasons:

    1) No threshold was set I.e 55 or 60% would be classed as a clear win. It was too close therefore it divides the country.
    2) Too many voters were googling to find out what EU meant before voting so shows lack of knowledge on EU.
    3) Had a storm in South East night before and places were flooded and low turnout
    4) Too many lies and misinformation about the pros and Cons.

    I could go on but most are covered by the blog above.

    March 30, 2017 at 12:57 pm
  • brian

    Which part of the majority of the British people voting to leave the EU do you not understand?

    March 30, 2017 at 1:00 pm
    • Emma

      Which part of my article do you not understand, Brian?? 🙂

      March 30, 2017 at 1:05 pm
      • Matt

        The bits where you use polls as facts? which lets face it is all of it.

        Polls have no real correlation to what people actually voted, they are just a small percentage in 1 place.

        March 30, 2017 at 6:05 pm
    • Ray W

      Brian – it was not a majority.
      Millions of Brits living and working abroad were not allowed a vote but are 100% affected by this.

      As for “majority” – a union would not be allowed to glhokd a strike if it was voted for in those numbers.
      If they were included then my expectation is that leave was NOT a majority.

      If those EU citizens who have permanently settled here, married, have children, worked for decades etc.. were allowed a vote, then remain was a clear majority.

      Even without the many millions of Brits and pseudo brits denied a vote – leave was 37% of the eligible vote . A trade union needs 40% to take industrial action. Strange how an organization that is run for it’s members has these rules from Government but the government doesn’t follow such rules when deciding the fate of the people.

      March 30, 2017 at 7:18 pm
  • Tony

    I agree with so much more of what you say. I’m very pro Europe and always have been and will be forever.

    I’m also a baby boomer. Not all of us have backed our country in to a corner.

    Just thought I’d mention that. Otherwise we are very much in agreement. 👍

    March 30, 2017 at 1:28 pm
    • Emma

      Yep, absolutely. As you’ll see from other comments I’ve made I based my comments on baby boomer Brexit voting patterns on stats – but of course not all baby boomers voted to Leave.

      March 30, 2017 at 1:55 pm
  • Danny Boy

    Great article, had me laughing (gallows humour???) as I was having my dinnertime brew at work- not too sure The Boss is convinced that it was a poorly translated email that had me chuckling while claiming to be working on a presentation, but he’ll get over it.

    Anyway, I think it’s been touched on in a couple of the comments (the whole “meant to be working” thing makes it difficult to read all of them) but while the Baby-Boomers have taken a lot of stick for this, there’s another group who seem to fly under the radar on this one- the non-voters. 27 (ish) percent of the people eligible to vote just didn’t and yet somehow seem to be blameless for the outcome. Not sure how that one works tbh.

    March 30, 2017 at 1:35 pm
  • Jon D

    I’m 39, voted Remain, and see myself more as a European, than a Britain (though right now, it’s less “Britain” and more like “Little England”)! I live in an area, that voted 60-40 to Remain, and yet we’re being told that jumping off a cliff, without a parachute, no safety net, and no idea how high-up we are, or what emergency services will be available if we jump off and injure ourselves, is somehow a fantastic plan… and I’m being forced off the cliff, whether I like it or not! 🙁

    The sick irony of this, is that Teresa May thinks that it’s okay to tell a Club (the EU) that:
    – you hate their guts
    – their incompetent at running the Club
    – you can do a better job of leading the Club
    – the membership is a rip-off
    – all the other 27 members are dickheads who know nothing
    – that any exit fee from the Club, will never be paid, despite it being in the Terms & Conditions that we signed-up too, and
    – that the Club should fuck-off-and-die, because without us, it’s nothing.

    And in the same breath, May is also saying:
    – but I still want to be a member of the Club
    – I still want the Club to give me money-off, and great deals/savings
    – that we want a gift from the Club’s management every Birthday, and cards at Christmas too,
    – I stil want all the positives of being a member of the Club, but none of the shit-stuff, and
    – that if you don’t give me all these benefits, whilst not actually being a member of the Club, then somehow that means the Club is a pile of shite!

    Yeah, what a fucking awesome plan that is, and that’s going to guarantee to work, isn’t it?!

    March 30, 2017 at 1:36 pm
  • Richard

    THIS is fucking awesome…channeling all the rage and anger I also feel about this sorry mess, and I speak as a baby boomer pissed off with the ignorant twats who voted for collective suicide on the basis of a populist koolaid laced with economic ignorance.

    PS…I have a word for the triggering of Article 50: BOSYCHICA*

    *Bend Over, Spread Your Cheeks, Here It Comes Again

    March 30, 2017 at 1:44 pm
  • Wendy Constantinoff

    I am a baby boomer and I along with many others that i know of voted remain.

    March 30, 2017 at 1:51 pm
  • Chris

    Emma, I have nothing to say other than you have totally hit the fucking nail on the fucking head! Brilliantly written and explained… Thank you!

    March 30, 2017 at 1:55 pm
  • Helen Lloyd

    Another furious and frustrated senior remain voter. The vast majority of my similarly aged friends also voted remain. However friends of my thirty-something son, (those who bothered to vote) voted to leave. My son was absolutely in the minority among his peers for voting to stay. Apart from the baby boomer comments, I agree 100%. Madness!

    March 30, 2017 at 2:09 pm
    • Emma

      Hi Helen, if you read the comments above (below??) you’ll see the links I’ve put in backing up my baby boomer comments. They’re not personal opinion. They’re based on stats! Honestly!!

      March 30, 2017 at 2:15 pm
  • Tom Blacker

    Hi Cathy,
    Lovely to hear you vent your spleen, I couldn’t agree more with everything you had to say, apart from the blaming of the opposition for their part. Labour returned 66% of its vote for Remain compared to The tories’ 48%. In Parliament, the tories have the overall majority, so the Opposition there was never going to be outstanding, with only one tory reneging, the inimitable Ken Clark, otherwise their whip held firm. It was a tory proposed fight, they promised the Referendum, they led both sides, they wrote the theme tune. Labour was split by constituencies, and ultimately that was the reason for their non-communal response. One mistake they did make in my view, was to not give Labour MPs a free vote. Other than that, they did their best in a fight between the tories, and they still queue up to vote tory! I’m another baby booming Remainer by the way. 😂

    March 30, 2017 at 2:10 pm
  • stephen leeder

    67 year old who voted Remain although cautiously. We are all to blame to some extent. The Tories were to keen to hold on to power so gave in to their nasty right wing. They also cocked up the referendum arrangements. All Governments have allowed inequality to reign. We didn’t want to pay more taxes so most of us colluded in that one. The EU has much about it that is brilliant but some stuff that corrupted it – the lies and bad behaviour that went on to keep the euro afloat and get new members is an example. They were also intransigent and in denial about the need for some change. I also am annoyed that my vote counted but by the time all the negotiations are completed (5 years?) I will be over 70 so will have less interest in future events than today’s teenagers who didn’t get a vote. One other thing – the people who ballsed up the referendum negotiations first time round and who failed to set sensible tipping points for change are the ones who are still in charge – so will they do any better second time round?
    My final observation is that May and co were very weak like Cameron. They should have recognised that a narrow split was potential trouble and should have had extensive studies done over a period of a year to get an independent view of things to present to the country – after all we keep getting told that Scotland shouldn’t get their vote because they don’t know what is on the table. What staggering hypocrisy – who exactly now knows what is on the table and yet we just jumped in both feet first. Stephen Leeder

    March 30, 2017 at 2:36 pm
  • Brad

    Wonderful article. I was nodding all the way through that!

    March 30, 2017 at 2:56 pm
  • David Shepherd

    I have always said that when a member of an organisation & you don’t like the way it works it’s better to try to change things from the Inside rather than slam the door. The E.U. is criticised in all its member states. In Brussels it seems that our politicians havemoved into the penthouse suite before finishing the foundations. I’m a UK citzen but wasn’t able to vote, like thousands of others.I’ve lived & worked in France for 42 years, my 2 daughters are French, my second wife is German, I’m a baby boomer but still believe in the E.U. but not in its present state. THe pre-referendum “debate” wasn’t worthy of Speakers’ Corner or a public bar brawl & shame on the British press. We like to think that Westminster is the Mother of Parliaments but shame on it & shame on our so-called represntatives who, whichever side you’re on, did not inform the electorate of what was really at stake.

    March 30, 2017 at 3:08 pm
  • Kay Leitch

    Well, Emma, I can see why the BBs are throwing their toys out of the pram! 🙂 I agree with pretty much everything you say – great piece – but not that. I too would come into that BabyBoomer category, I guess, though I’ve never felt we had it easy: having to leave Scotland to find work when we were 22, barely able to afford the rent (never mind clothes, which were bloody expensive then), couldn’t afford to buy a house… interest rates at 14%… so no, lots of us didn’t have rich mummies and daddies, fat divorce settlements or rich partners to pay for our lives. Different times, different problems. I understand it’s not personal, though. And although most of my (enlightened) friends voted to Remain, I know the ones who didn’t and I know why. It doesn’t put them in a good light.

    I have bad bad feelings about not-so-great Britain since Brexit. (More like completely fucked Britain.) I voted to Remain, and would again. Will I get the chance? I truly don’t think so. My feeling now is if anyone can afford to leave fucked-up Britain, do so now and start a new life somewhere else. I would very much like to leave what I believe is coming, to the morons who voted for it. They deserve it.

    March 30, 2017 at 3:11 pm
  • Claud

    I’m not a ‘Brit’.
    I live in a proud Wales, and have done so for the last 20 years. And just to make my ideological position clear, I am quite on the far left of centre – by current standards (not that it takes a great deal of left-walking to end up there based on the current standards…)
    However, being a working class socialist, I have been struggling with coming to terms with many who, in the so-called ‘liberal-left’ praise the glory of the Great European Union of Peoples. The reality on the ground is, alas, very different from the perceived brit-tellectual cosmopolitan EU lover’s perception. And, while I’d agree that there will at least be some short-term economic inconveniences from Despicable Maggie II’s decision to implement what is, and let’s not be equivocal here, the will of the British people.
    Yes, perhaps some of these aforementioned peoples may not have a vast understanding of the idealistic huggy-lovy reach-over-the-channell propensities of many of us, but their choice is just as valid. one person, one vote. The Sun is a veritable receptacle of shit-fuck-crap-merde-cacca-shise, BUT, so is the fucking Guardian.
    Whose propaganda is more righteous?? because that is what we are arguing, no? The righteous to the left against the ignoramus on the right? “Our” sociopolitical acumen Vs “their” complete lack of global geopolitical understanding, innit?
    The virtue-signalling madness of many LibLabbers have even swayed JC (Not Jesus Christ) into pretending to be a long-standing friend of the EU, only to see the Party half destroyed by this morbid game of chicken. Had everyone kept their boundary-crossing star-circled hearts inside their sleeve, we may have a strong Labour party, maybe even IN power (unbelievable, hey?) with a strong mandate from the actual working class who, rightly or not, voted to LEAVE!

    How about that: The European project is, and always have been, A FARCE. It is the Fourth Reich. Just ask the Southern European counties what they think of the institution you have so eloquently eulogised here. EU=a steaming big continent-wide pile of fresh turd.
    Time to wake up. I’m done with having people saying that they are socialists AND europhiles in the same sentence. I’d say you gotta sort out that cognitive dissonance!! A commie that supports the Fascist SuperState?? the peace-loving friends of the Eurogendfor?? The Commission (of the reich??).
    Lenin is shitting himself in his grave. delirious stuff.

    March 30, 2017 at 3:13 pm
  • David Whelan

    Life’s far more complicated than your angry rant of Brexit cliches.

    Lets check out some stats on the advisory referendum:
    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36616028

    -Firstly let’s not forget the turnout was very high indeed at 72%.
    -If you remove Scotland from the vote (let’s face it they love the SNP, who want to remove themselves from the UK anyway). The statistics would have been far higher than 48% remain 52% leave.
    -Let’s then look at the demographics of where people voted remain. Once again you see (Apart from Scotland – who understandably want to keep both EU grants AND Barnet formula grants) people in the cities were most likely to remain. Look at the stats of where the votes to remain were highest. City of London, Universities Oxford and Cambridge, Fulham, Westminster, Gibraltar (which is a uniquely skewed result), and other London boroughs.

    This points to me to be elitist, wealthy areas that want to preserves their jobs and assets and the status quo. A place with a high concentrated volume of people who think a similar way, educated a similar way and have decent jobs. They might have believed just about every global leader, economist, celebrity and government minister who signed up to project fear, They worried about big global corporations, banks, industry in Thames Valley and London might withdraw to continent. This directly affects their lives, their house prices.

    BUT to these people:
    https://www.theguardian.com/public-leaders-network/gallery/2015/oct/02/england-most-least-deprived-places-in-pictures

    In contrast this would have a relatively limited effect on, for example, people living in Doncaster, poor nothern towns, the countryside, and fishing ports. These people were desperate, facing austerity, higher taxes on fags and booze, a bleak future for young or just apathetic to the idea that they should be grateful to all the immigrants propping up the country to support them. Nobody from any major UK part of the EU was appealing to them.. they didn’t need to understand EU laws, or the intricate working of global trade. Their main concerns are affordable housing, reasonable schools and healthcare. They literally had nothing to lose by voting out.

    I would also add to this your generalisation of the elder generations and baby boomers. Many of which we know are suffering hardship, suffering in care homes, and hit by a double whammy of decades of an underfunded NHS but growing demand for services due to UK population increases. And ironically they were still likely clinging on to that now nasty and outdate concept of British Patriotism.

    These are the people you are really angry with.

    March 30, 2017 at 3:17 pm
    • Anne Greaves

      But you can’t remove Scotland from the vote; they’re part of the UK (as we speak)

      March 30, 2017 at 7:30 pm
    • Derick Tulloch

      Hi David

      SNP member here. We wish to dissolve the UK, not leave it. because it is no longer functional.

      62% Remain in the EU. Every is single local authority remain. Including Shetland, where I’m from.

      The Scottish Government’s compromise paper “Scotland’s Place in Europe’ (Scotland to stay in the UK after Brexit, but access the single market by joining EFTA) – rejected out of hand.

      So we will vote again, and hopefully rejoin Europe.

      April 1, 2017 at 6:25 pm
  • Claud

    PS: How do I edit my post? I left a sentence hanging in mid air… lol.
    Anyway, Hasta Queen Victoria Siempre! 🙂

    March 30, 2017 at 3:18 pm
  • David

    I understand that not every “baby boomer” would have voted to Leave, but to all the people complaining about that part of the analysis – surely you understand why this has to be said? The general trend towards older voters voting Leave is clear and backed up by the statistics. It isn’t meant as a personal attack on you if you so happen to fit within that demographic.
    I am a Remainer from Wales and although it really hurts to say it, it is not inaccurate to say that the Welsh voted (when taken as a group) to leave.
    I believe it is important to keep making the point about the demographic disparity in voting patterns, precisely because it gives substance to the claim that the young have been robbed of a future that (on the whole) they wanted. In the end, politics is won and lost on its narratives (“Take Back Control”, “Make America Great Again”) and this narrative I think is a powerful one that can be used for the fightback. Opposing Brexit itself might be a lost cause, but I sure as hell do not agree with where that leaves us and would want to ensure that there will be a continual movement to re-join Europe.

    March 30, 2017 at 3:31 pm
  • Michael White

    Michael White
    michael@tritec.com.au

    Emma,
    I have read your rant and you are obviously very upset that the referendum didn’t go your way or, more to the point, the way you think it should have gone. You sound like a typical leftist who is not prepared to accept any point of view unless,of course, it is the same as yours. I believe that in a few years time you will have nothing to worry about because the EU will have imploded. All of the Eu Mediterranean countries have been bankrupted by the EU and the Euro. In Spain a fully qualified teacher is paid €1,000.00 a month after tax. Do you think you could manager on that.

    You must always remember that, in the first place, the U.K. never joined the United States of Europe, it joined the EU which was a tariff free trading zone, beneficial to all.

    Please stop ranting like a spoiled brat!!

    March 30, 2017 at 3:32 pm
    • Matt

      And stop using polls as facts too.

      March 30, 2017 at 6:08 pm
    • George

      Your last paragraph shows your ignorance and your lack of British and European political history!
      A unified Europe is much stronger and better than individual countries with borders.
      Is it hard to achieve? Yes, Does it have challenges and road bumps? You bet. Is it years or decades away? Sure. But it’s worth every single struggle and fight to create a union where we celebrate our differences our diversity and we share common humanity, democracy, values, policies unified economy and political and social purpose. To me this is the European ideal. If you are against that then you did right for voting “Leave” that day in June. But if you think, like many delusional Brexiters, that EUs deterioration and collapse is good and won’t affect Britain, think again.
      Hiding behind reconstituted sovereignty here in Britain, we are not going to escape this vortex that will be created by a potential collapse of the EU. If the Eurozone for instance breaks up/splits due to EUs disintegration, you are going to have an economic havoc that will make the 2008 US house mortgage crash (that lead to a global recession) look like a mosquito bite. The shock waves of such an economic collapse will be felt across Europe and around the globe as our financial and banking system is interconnected, especially for a country like Britain with enormous financial and trading ties with the EU (in or out of it). You are looking at a huge dividing line, like a new Berlin wall, this time between France and Germany running down the Rhine and across the Alps. The Germanic lands, anything east of the Rhine are going to become deflationary because of the new Deutch mark that will depreciate, the rest of Europe is going to be stagflationary with a combination of high inflation and high unemployment. Do you really believe that Britain is going to be unaffected by this!? That Britain is going to sail in across the Atlantic in the land of gold under every rainbow and unicorns?! You are in for a hard awakening!

      March 31, 2017 at 3:11 pm
  • Paul Dennis

    As a baby boomer who voted us INTO the EU all those years ago – and with a much bigger margin – I could take issue.
    But I’m already pissed off enough by having ‘will of the people’ spouted at me, when my ‘will of the people’ vote back then, was subsequently trashed by the rash gamble of a weak PM trying to appease A FEW members of his party who just kept banging on about Europe.
    This vote was no reflection on wishes of the ‘hard working people’ that the Tories like to mention as often as possible, because the hard working people know that a lot of their jobs can be adversely affected by leaving the EU.
    Boris, Gove, Farage etc. etc. hard working? They are charlatans, three card tricksters.
    Then we come to May the unelected. Supposedly a remainer (though if you remember her run ins with Brussels while she was Home Sec. it looks a bit of a fib), she chose not to campaign hard so as not to sully herself if/when a leadership bunfight ensued.
    Well played TM the PM, you put your own ambition ahead of the good of the nation – and sadly that cop out Corbyn is out of the same egg.
    I voted remain.

    March 30, 2017 at 3:37 pm
  • Johnny Jahlfrezi Morris

    If it’s any help I think you’ve got it pretty much covered. Only one thing I would add, regarding the NHS promise. Nigel Farage was on breakfast TV the day after the referendum. I have watched breakfast TV about 6 times in my whole life. I watched that morning because I was fuming and wanted to see what was going on. He said, with a smug smirking face, “We should never have promised that money to the NHS.” The day after the vote. He withdrew one of the Leave campaigns most potent tagline promises displayed on the side of a bus and all over the Internet, TV and papers for weeks if not months. Twaticus Completicus.

    March 30, 2017 at 4:16 pm
  • Huw

    It occurs to me that as individuals we have the protection of the mental capacit act when making important decisions such as taking out loans, insurance etc and it is the responsibility of those providing the service, such as a loan, that we have the mental capacity to do so. They also have a responsibility to ensure that any decision in such a context is based on full and accurate information that the person can understand and believe, retain, weigh in the balance and finally that they can then communicate their decision. Substituting the UK population for the individual, arguably the criteria for Brexit being a valid capacitious decision would not be met.

    March 30, 2017 at 4:19 pm
  • C.J.Niblett

    After reading the foul language and all the rubbish about those of us who voted to come out just remember we “older one’s” can remember what it was like to run our own country ourselves and when you all talk of rubbish I think E.U can manage that very well without our help. Thank god we nearly have our country back.

    March 30, 2017 at 4:33 pm
    • Emma

      The first paragraph of the blog is quite explicit about the foul language. Please don’t complain about it – as I said in the opening lines, “you were warned, mate.”

      March 30, 2017 at 6:14 pm
    • Anne Greaves

      What a load of reactionary tosh. Stop believing the Daily Mail and Farage etc who have created a sense of outrage where there was none for their own interests.

      March 30, 2017 at 7:33 pm
    • pontaumur

      Have what country back from whom ?

      March 31, 2017 at 4:49 pm
  • Gareth

    What a pity you never once mentioned the true reason for Brexi. Instead you re quoted and ranted in the same manner as the newspapers you blame for polluting everyone’s mind. ( I sat on the fence by the way as I see the benefits of either choice). It’s not about immigration it never was, it’s not about European laws it never was (I could go on) it’s about making our own choices about whom should emigrate here and having our own Supreme Court have the final say based on how we in this country view just and fair. Immigration will always exist, and that’s good. Law will always be necessary, and that’s good too. The whole problem with Europe has always been that it can never agree. Every country only seeks to benefit itself never the whole entity. They all agree rules then ignore them (we never seemed to work that bit out here).
    Yes were out. Yes it was a tight vote and yes some bits will end up better for us and some worse. But please can we all stop bitching about a democratic vote we may not have agreed with and just get on with life!

    March 30, 2017 at 4:49 pm
  • Patrick Chapman

    Well swearing should meet swearing of course. So ‘Bollocks’ to you Emma!

    March 30, 2017 at 4:59 pm
  • Alan Realist

    Who gives a fuck what you think??
    We’re leaving the unelected EU to move forward as a sovereign nation.
    It’s a big old world out there, thankfully not full of fuckwitt snowflakes like you and your ‘right on’ mates!
    Too late to be crying into your eco-latte now, love.

    March 30, 2017 at 5:32 pm
  • Andrew Waddell-Tillbrook

    I love you!

    March 30, 2017 at 5:35 pm
  • Avril

    Brilliant article, Emma! Thank you. I particularly enjoyed the part about Scotland and their next vote for independence. And I say that as a Baby Boomer remain voter! The Brexit vote does seem to have lifted the lid on Pandora’s box and let out a lot of nasty emotions. I am so sick of people telling me to ‘get over it’!

    March 30, 2017 at 6:02 pm
  • Amy

    Actually, this is not quite right. It wasn’t 48% of the population that voted for Leave. It was 48% of the people who voted on that day, so it’s a lot, lot less than 48% of the population.

    March 30, 2017 at 6:07 pm
    • Robert

      I believe that the correct figure was 37% of the population voted to leave.

      Congrats on a truly superlative rant Emma. Nothing to disagree with there.

      March 30, 2017 at 7:18 pm
  • Rhod Jones

    I’m 70 and a big believer in a strong united europe so thus voted Remain. Have voted Tory all my life but never again, to be honest I hope that the Conservative Party is brought down by this, it does in reality have a significant UKIP caucus which needs to go its own way. Glad someone has started to use plain swear words about this it’s refreshing. I am looking forward to the breakup of the UK, if nothing else it’ll be one in the eye for Mrs May and perhaps hasten the fragmentation of her party. Trying to change anything in this country is difficult because of the electoral system, which really needs to have a proportional element. The downside to all of this is that it is making me really angry and am beginning to have more than mildly aggressive views about the way certain individuals should be treated and I don’t think they are going to go away.

    March 30, 2017 at 6:10 pm
  • Julia Underwood

    Passionate and devistated Remainer me – 61. Ashamed of my generation with this. That means ashamed of a lot of my friends. Happy that my family all agree at all generation levels except the mother-in-law. There must be a joke in there somewhere!

    March 30, 2017 at 7:16 pm
  • Anne Greaves

    I’m a baby boomer too and a staunch Remainer! But I loved your blog all the same, expressed my feelings exactly!

    March 30, 2017 at 7:26 pm
  • Merrill Irving

    I agree with every word you say and I am 67! I voted to go into the eu and despite its faults want to stay in. In today’s frightening world we need friends and not the likes of Trump!

    March 30, 2017 at 9:07 pm
  • tilly

    as a ba y boomer I totally agree with everything you said aoart from baby boomer bit…neither me, my oartner or any of my friends voted to leave – why would we? we’ve spent almost all of our lives as part of Europe and are gutted to be dragged away from it 💝

    March 30, 2017 at 9:16 pm
    • Emma

      Hey Tilly, thanks for commenting. But you do accept that many baby boomers voted to Leave? The stats are there for all to see. I live in the North, but where I live in Trafford, we voted strongly to Remain. But the North was largely a Leave area. It doesn’t mean *all* Northerners voted to leave, just as not *all* baby boomers voted to leave. But a lot did!

      March 30, 2017 at 9:21 pm
  • Jeff Featherstone

    Bearing in mind that a number of those baby boomers voted in the previous referendum in 1975, with a two thirds majority to remain, and that a number had vlearly changed their minds by laxt year, one could say that they’re the ones with the most experience of the EU and have become disillusioned by it over the years, so they were actually very well informed voters.

    March 30, 2017 at 9:55 pm
    • Emily

      Jeff – I think that’s a good point. There’s also the possibility that while older leave voters have often been labelled as being inconsiderate of what the younger generation wanted, they may well believe that they are doing their bit for them by voting the U.K. out as much as the ones who voted in for the same reason.

      My own father, a young 71, voted out in 1975 and would’ve done again. But he says he thought we’d invested too much to pull out and that his children and grandchildren would have had better chances by remaining as an EU member.

      A big issue to boil down to such a simple question, perhaps.

      March 31, 2017 at 11:51 am
  • Jan

    Excuse me – I’m a baby boomer and am a passionate remainer. And please spell Elizabethan right. While I agree with a lot of what you say, don’t alienate people by categorising them.

    March 30, 2017 at 10:05 pm
    • Emma

      Hi Jan – please read my comments below giving links to stats about baby boomer Brexit voters. My comments aren’t based on prejudice, but on facts. I’m sorry you’re so vexed with me. Thanks for spotting the typo. Have a good day now.

      March 30, 2017 at 10:15 pm
  • Kevin

    Thank you for the blog Emma .. and I know you must be getting pissed off with having to defend your remarks about baby boomers. But …

    There are quite a few baby boomers who, like me, live in Europe. I have lived in Luxembourg long enough not to be allowed to vote in the referendum. Many of my younger British colleagues have not been away from the UK long enough yet to have lost their vote. I wonder if that accounts for some of the age-skew in the voting.

    I am still angry, not so much about the result, but about the fact that I had no say in the matter. And at the people in the UK who say “… well it doesn’t affect you ‘cos you don’t live here.” Like hell it doesn’t. I am seriously worried about my pension rights, and my right to live in the country that has been my home for the past 24 years.

    March 30, 2017 at 10:19 pm
    • Emma

      Hey Kevin – thanks for taking the time to comment. I’m more weary of being patronised by baby boomers who are rude and aggressive, tbh; while trying to take a high ground many come across as high-handed, pious and sometimes downright nasty. Many, of course – as you’ll see in these comments – have been lovely.

      Interestingly, the comments here on my blog have been (mainly) reasonably polite. Over on my FB page, it’s a different kettle of fish. There, I’ve encountered some very odious individuals who claim some kind of moral superiority on account of their age while doing the cyber-equivalent of punching me in the face. Nice, eh?

      I’m not surprised you’re bloody angry. If it helps, I’m putting a supportive (if slightly clammy) hand on your shoulder.

      March 30, 2017 at 10:25 pm
      • Emily

        I don’t understand why we can’t debate this without being abusive or taking things too personally. Like you, I read the same statistics about how the vote broke down in terms of age – and if I make a sweeping statement or get my facts wrong then please someone, feel free to correct me. But without being aggressive behind an anonymous screen.

        Would we be like this face-to-face? I doubt it!

        March 31, 2017 at 11:41 am
  • Julan

    Not a baby boomer, voted leave and believe all will be well, to the same extent you think the country will go to Hell In a handcart. The reality……. neither of us know because it’s not been done before. Before I get a barrage of abuse, I’m a full time carer for my son who has multiple and profound disabilities and my wife is a Senior Reporting Radiographer at the local hospital and she voted leave too. “Stay calm all will be well”!!!

    March 30, 2017 at 11:00 pm
    • Emily

      Not my article, but replying to you all the same. I don’t think anyone should get a barrage of abuse for voting leave – you did so no doubt with good intentions.

      And you’re right, we don’t know what will happen. As a remainer I truly hope things do work out, but I’m skeptical about how it’s going so far.

      I do think there was a lot of nonsense from both sides and that the referendum was thrown together last minute by people who wanted to further or save their political careers. That said, I can see why people did choose leave given the evidence presented, while disagreeing with their choice.

      March 31, 2017 at 11:34 am
  • Nemanlostatsea

    You mention that 16 million people are going to get fucked up the arse, but spare a thought for those that voted Leave. They’re going to be fucked up the arse just as hard the 16 million. You may say they deserve it – I’d blame BJ, NF etc. Because the 17 million were misled, and they are not going to get what they voted for any more than the Remainers are going to get to stay in the EU.

    March 30, 2017 at 11:37 pm
  • Graham

    You dont mention the elevated levels of racism in (East) Europe, in 2015 (ie before any mention of Referendum). Why is that?

    Could it be that UK awareness of issues elsewhere, in different languages, in newspapers we have never seen, with politicians we have never heard of, does not register

    As one of the larger, richer, countries, we have had an easy ride, but austerity has taken us down a notch or two. Other countries have had the same, but being poorer, smaller, they have suffered.

    But we dont hear about Greece selling off its mining rights, to stay afloat. Occasional riots there, are shown next to occasional riots here, and we dont have to think of what happens, when the GP/pharmacy has empty shelves. That is not reported in English, so we ignore it.

    We are not NEXT on the list, but the entire flotilla of countries are tightly bound, and we are all being manipulated into another credit crunch, or whatever they have planned. Even without a MENTION of a referendum, we would harmonise the POUND with the EURO, with ever deeper behind the scenes committments, until we have an independent currency, that is completely the same.

    Then the next crisis, promotes the EU parliament, and president to have actual power. How will you feel (much as the US did) having a choice of Marine-Le-Penn and Whoever-Is-Coming-From-The-Eastern-Block as our next leader?

    I cant even name the foreign prime-ministers, never mind know them.

    March 30, 2017 at 11:46 pm
    • Emma

      Gimme a break! If I’d have written the socio-political backdrop to Brexit across the continent of Europe, it would have been a very very very long article indeed. Sheesh.

      March 31, 2017 at 4:02 am
  • David Cameron

    I’m not going to say all Brexit voters were pig ignorant twats with er – unusual – views on what racism is, but, it must every Brexiter I’ve met hasn’t studied past leaving school and seems to want to rant irrationally about immigrants.

    The general view about what will come is that there will apparently be major growth in wages and all those who couldn’t be arsed to put in the work successful people have will get a much easier ride. Cos, you know, employers will employ stupid fuckers and pay them loads now instead of choosing the best qualified candidates as usual.

    Ah – I forgot – no more unelected elites *cough cough – House of Lords*.

    March 31, 2017 at 1:06 am
  • Widge

    That’s bloody fantastic.

    March 31, 2017 at 1:26 am
  • Geoff Thomas

    You can stuff your Baby Boomer comments up your backside you condescending, ageist arsehole.

    It was Baby Boomers getting charged by half ton feckin’ Police Horses and “Falling down the steps” at single story Cop Shops back in the Late Sixties and early Seventies protesting Nuclear armaments and the Viet Nam war. That was US, that was, not a bunch of Facebook Warriors talking shit from the safety of their keyboards in basement rooms while their aged parents keep them and feed them.

    And what happened last June when a March in Trafalgar Square was FUCKING CANCELLED and the YOUNG organisers CALLED THE FUCKING thing OFF “Because it may have been a little dangerous because LOTS and LOTS of people are coming – Ooooohhhhhhhhh”

    Bunch of fucking lightweight losers.

    March 31, 2017 at 3:38 am
    • Emma

      How wonderful to be called an “arsehole” by a complete stranger on my blog. I really hope it made you feel more empowered in your life. Oh, and before you froth yourself up too much, bear in mind my comments about baby boomers were based on STATISTICS. You know, FACTS. They were not – as I’ve said ad bloody nauseum in these comments – based on personal prejudice.

      You go carefully now, Geoff. And for the love of God, cheer up.

      March 31, 2017 at 4:07 am
      • Elizabeth

        Can I just say Emma that you have made my day ! I worry that my obsession re EU is all consuming and then when I read your words I realise I’m not alone so take heart my dear …

        March 31, 2017 at 9:30 am
  • Emma

    For anyone interested in an academic analysis of the the Great Repeal Bill, here’s a very thorough blog post from Mark Elliott, a Professor of Public Law at Cambridge University. The final para is of great import – and a cause for great concern. https://publiclawforeveryone.com/2017/03/30/the-governments-white-paper-on-the-great-repeal-bill-some-preliminary-thoughts/

    March 31, 2017 at 4:49 am
  • DevilsAdvocate

    So Emma, can you please point us in the direction of your published / public opinion on the changes needed to be made to the E.U. agreement. You know, the ones you published over the years, well before Brexit was even voted on.

    Because there is nothing worse than someone who only demands change after something has gone horrible wrong for them. And all of a sudden they give a shit and are full of advice.

    Note: I think when people say they don’t like experts advice, I think they mean fake experts. You know, the ones who are always wrong but manage to still keep their “expert” title, and never aplogise.

    March 31, 2017 at 5:44 am
  • DevilsAdvocate

    Yes…Literally nothing worse… Because all the bad stuff I see happening globally did not happen in a vacuum, or overnight.

    Issues were ignored by those who claim to be smarter than their adversaries, until after the tipping point came.

    Things I am passionate about, I am pro-active about. Or I know I risk people not taking me seriously. That is one lesson no-one needs a higher education for.

    March 31, 2017 at 6:44 am
    • Emma

      And have you written and published your public opinion on “all the bad stuff” you see happening in the world, DevilsAdvocate? Because until you can show it to me, I point blank refuse to take you seriously. (See – ridiculous that, isn’t it?). Have yourself a good day now, you tantalisingly anonymous spirit of light, you.

      March 31, 2017 at 7:58 am
  • Davina

    Yep….totally agree with all of it. I AM a “Baby-Boomer”, but voted remain. We were however, the luckiest generation ever in my opinion – we had it all. So, for the life of me, why do we NOT want the same for our children and their children??? The UK is so screwed.

    March 31, 2017 at 8:03 am
  • DevilsAdvocate

    Actually . I own a pretty big website dedicated to helping people recover from morbid obesity, and exercise options for people with life threatening muscle wasting conditions. I also expose corrupt academics who make money off peoples suffering whilst offer no practical help. Those fake experts I love so much.

    All my disability work I have been doing free for 14 years now.

    My profession is Mortuary Science, and I still run my mortuary.

    So yes, in the things I am passionate about. I put my money where my mouth is long ago.

    March 31, 2017 at 8:18 am
    • Emma

      I take my hat off to you – that sounds like fantastic, productive work. I wish you all the very best. Thanks for taking the time to contact me.

      March 31, 2017 at 8:25 am
  • Denise Channing

    What I wonder is why all mentions of the 48% these days forget to mention the appallingly low turn out for the vote. Less than a quarter of eligible voters opted to leave and many of those were protest votes from people who presumed it would never pass. Others learned soon after that the big red bus was a lie, along with other promises. If a second referendum were held today, I have no doubt we would see a very different result.

    March 31, 2017 at 8:51 am
  • George

    A key point for me that is the public must be well informed for a vote to be democratic. We were all deliberately mis-informed. By the press and the government itself.
    All elections have some exaggeration, but this referendum was in another league altogether – Government ministers were given free rein by their party to lie to the population.

    They knew they would not be held accountable and they were right (the government and press have done little about this – in fact some of the culprits have been promoted).

    Where were the for and against for both sides provided by the government? Why did they need to hide the negative sides and exaggerate/ lie about the positives of leaving?

    You are right Emma this is an outright con.

    March 31, 2017 at 9:10 am
  • Donna

    Well, said, Emma! I agree with everything, and I understand about the language. Sometimes there really are no other words.

    March 31, 2017 at 9:25 am
  • Elizabeth

    Thank you Emma for your words straight out of my mouth bad language as well! I’m sickened by the monstrocity of a government so scared of its UKIP wing that it gambled with the lives of so many citizens. This utopia of a golden empire again that was fed to us by yet another monster the Tory press drugged on the ecstasy of a great all powerful production line of UK products and services that is never ever going to happen. So yes we all need to vent our feelings however we can this sceptred isle has become a septic Isle filled with hate and division.. Thank you again

    March 31, 2017 at 9:27 am
  • Ellie Porter

    “I don’t like the outcome therefore it isn’t democracy.”

    I am 18 soon. Couldn’t vote, but over it. Democracy won either way.

    March 31, 2017 at 10:23 am
  • Emily

    A very interesting piece. And good to read so many boomers’ comments. For the record I don’t think you’re being personally blamed, we can only go by the figures and percentages presented on the results.

    For the record my boomer parents both voted to remain, although my dad has huge reservations about the EU itself. Likewise, I’ve met a good number of younger people who voted to leave.

    I was a remainer and am not happy about the result, although I respect differences of opinions. I am not one of the people labelling leavers as daft, although plenty had ridiculous reasons for quitting the EU (I still don’t know what my well-to-do friend meant when he said we could be “great again” and he couldn’t tell me either!). I can totally see why people voted out when they were told that the money would be ploughed back into our hospitals, etc.

    I am, however, pissed off with the way the referendum was handled, as if it was a public school boy spat. Boris Johnson is the last person who’d care about funding projects in the north-east or the NHS and he should be put in the stocks for even suggesting it when he knew was fibbing. Likewise Cameron gave every impression of a highly-educated man with no common sense – fancy going for a simple majority to effect a big constitutional change! Of course it could’ve gone the other way. And if so far from gloating and calling leavers bad losers or snowflakes, I would’ve breathed a sigh of relief while recognising that something had to be done about our relationship with the EU since so many people were unhappy about it.

    As for the triggering of A50 meaning no way back, seeing as it’s never happened before there’s no precedent to base it on. I hope that Ms May will at least offer a second referendum on terms negotiated and that the country gets all the facts.

    March 31, 2017 at 10:33 am
  • Diane

    lol this is all so funny. Facts are more people voted to leave, end of. Sounds more like sour grapes to me. We managed fine before we were in the EU and we will manage again but without being told what to do by other countries. I think people got the biggest shock of their lives because people got off their butts and voted for a change because they were sick of where this country is heading.

    March 31, 2017 at 10:37 am
  • Tony Poll

    Excellent blog.
    Does anyone know of somewhere we can rally? I don’t mean a protest meeting at Westminster, but a political movement. I want to do something to stop this madness, but I don’t know where or how.
    Then, when the term of leaving are published we can lobby for a referendum, and everyone should REALLY know what they are voting for. If a second referendum is not on the cards, then a political movement that stands at the next general election, where the candidates clearly stand for the single issue: Remain (or re-join)
    As mentioned above, Nick Clegg says a lot of reasonable stuff (accepting that when he was in a coalition he had to compromise and make some very hard choices!). Perhaps he is the natural leader, since I’m not sure who else a viable option. He’d get my vote.

    March 31, 2017 at 11:06 am
  • Simon Brand

    Thank you for saying this (and in this manner)

    It does sound like you have been evedropping me

    March 31, 2017 at 11:31 am
  • Freda Brodie

    Another “baby boomer” putting her tuppence worth in. I voted to stay. I tried and failed to make friends voting out to realise that they were doing so with blinkers on. They were focused on the immigrant numbers and believed “wrongly” that all non brits ould go “home”. One of my big concerns are about human rights. In particular, the laws regarding workers rights. Minimum wage, holiday entitlements, maternity leave and all the other rules iimplemented to meet with EU regulations, all rules that hit the pockets of the employers. Already we are seeing laws being changed/repealed. I fear that the “living” wage promises will not now be met. There are many other worries about leaving but with me being 62 this year (and still not getting my pension because of that change) and not working, and hubby being 54 and a care worker on 31 hours on the so called living wage, it all worries me.

    March 31, 2017 at 12:48 pm
  • Boris

    Seriously?! Get over it. I’d also like you reflect on how the EU operates. It doesn’t surprise me that ‘remainers’ still don’t accept a majority vote…because the EU is undemocratic and you are obviously fine with that. I am however not, I believe in democracy and the right to be able to choose who governs this (and more importantly who doesn’t) land and the laws that guide it. You talk about baby boomers…of course they choose out…because they know the EU turned into something they never wanted. I suspect if I was to categorise you Emma…you’ll be a left wing middle to upper class lady living in relative comfort. To you the EU has delivered a lifestyle you enjoy, and immigration has no direct impact on your life or circumstance. The point is and what the vote showed, is there are literally millions of people it isn’t working for…and the only time they can change this, is now. Because if we’re in the EU we are part of a bureaucratic system that is building a super state by stealth. The vote happened, it was fair, you are in the minority…now deal with it. I’m so fed up with left wing individuals who think their opinion is the only one and demonstrate more communist like behaviours than democratic ones.

    March 31, 2017 at 1:18 pm
  • Jessie

    Wonderfully put. Very eloquent. And definitely not too much swearing, considering the shit the UK is in!

    March 31, 2017 at 1:38 pm
  • Babs

    Brilliant Emma! It would be great if you could use your soap box to get some real information out to people. The mainstream press just seems either information free (Brexit means Brexit, let’s have a red, white and blue Brexit, get the best deal possible) or spreading actually false information (laws made by unelected bureaucrats, bring back control). How about explaining to people what the EU budget is spent on? How useful the red-tape is for business, social protection and environmental protection (and how we’re going to have to shadow it or not be able to trade). How laws are made in the EU? How the UK is, and always has been, sovereign? How Brexit, far from bringing back control, will mean we have less control (no say in the direction of the EU, or its laws, but as a trading partner and neighbour obliged to follow and put-up with the consequences?). That the arguments about immigration were deeply flawed? How the Euro, far from being a disaster, is an important world currency? How UK finances (especially consumer debt) are deeply troubling? Why the UK owes money to the EU (see Michel Barnier’s speech of 22nd March http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_SPEECH-17-723_en.htm)…. thanks !!!

    March 31, 2017 at 2:03 pm
  • Suck it up

    Sorry, but that is a load of bollocks. I voted remain and am not happy about leaving, but ONLY because we are the first to leave and have no idea how this is going to pan out. The fact is NOT ONE SINGLE REMAIN voter would have been kicking up such a stink if the UK had voted to stay in and would not be moaning about the fact that it was agreed the vote would be on a ‘binary’ basis. The whole point was we were not voting on a soft/hard/need viagra basis, we were voting yes or no. Same during EVERY election, you get one vote for one party.
    Sorry but those who continue to moan are just being pathetic, suck it up and lets make the best of this. If we get out (and that is a bit IF), you can always vote for another party that will simply take us back in and again! It’s called democracy and within democracy you have to accept other points of view and accept that you aren’t always right. The biggest problem with politics at the moment is that people have lost the ability to accept another point of view – I am right you are wrong – is the view of everyone at the moment and if anything fucking stinks it’s that!

    March 31, 2017 at 3:13 pm
  • David

    It is all very well to say that the fault for this lies with my generation but it doesn’t!! The fault for this egregious cock-up lies with the 1/3 of the electorate (mostly young people) WHO DIDN’T VOTE AT ALL!!! At the age of 64 I voted Remain. The morning after, I skipped shocked and distressed, and went straight to angry, and I am still there!!!! Please excuse the exclamation marks and the UPPER CASE!!!!!

    March 31, 2017 at 3:39 pm
  • David Bird

    I am so annoyed that anyone is still taking notice of the so called polls that have given the results of how the age groups voted, most of the polls were of just a few thousand persons some were on the telephone and I know what happens when I get phone calls asking for me to participate in a survey. This was just such a small sample to the actual numbers that voted that it was just worthless. All the over 65 year old people I know voted to remain, this statement is true but should not be continually quoted unlike the crap that the pollsters and statisticians came up with and seems to be driving everyone even those who were and still are staunch remain supporters.

    March 31, 2017 at 4:50 pm
  • George

    When any post opens with inaccurate facts I turn off and don’t read them, why? it probably means the rest of there facts and comments are also incorrect! Figures can make any subject look good depending on their stats and figures! EG Positive the glass is half full, Negative the glass is half empty! The inaccurate opening line “Theresa May, “OUR UNELECTED PRIME MINISTER has opted to trigger Article 50 after an advisory referendum peddled on lies, to begin the process of the UK leaving the EU” No Prime Minister has ever been elected by the UK voters, unless your in Labour Party (and it has happened with the Tories as in Margaret Thatcher) and Leader’s carries a vote of no confidence, then the Labour member voters or the Tory faithful member’s have their say! Otherwise Prime Ministers are always elected by the Party Members of Parliament. I think we should all wait till its done. The Country voted to leave, the PM is getting the best possible deal she can from a union which is all ready itself in the final death throws of a united Union!

    March 31, 2017 at 4:50 pm
  • pontaumur

    Spot on blog thanks ! Brexit amounts to a political coup nothing less. Our european citizenship stolen from us by the bigots of the tory right and that rag bag ukip. Keep fighting !!

    March 31, 2017 at 4:53 pm
  • John

    I share a completely different point of view and I’m married to an educated european and have two children who are dual nationality.
    I chose to leave, because I’ve lived under the rule of the EU the whole of my political life. It hasn’t been a bed of roses and therefore I don’t like what I see. I also see the EU failing in the near future too and would always suggest getting out of something ahead of the bigger problem.
    We have strength in this country. We can believe in ourselves, but liberalism has taken over and softened us. I’ve noticed how people now live in fear of hearing the truth, opposed to blatant lies.
    I don’t forget important things in politics. Politics has become extremely ugly in the last twenty years.
    Money and greed is the bigger problem that affects us beyond the politics.
    Hereby, getting distracted with the underlying issue, blowing out hot air is doing nothing but aiding and abetting what is really going on.
    There has been unsettlement, but give it time, you’ll probably live to see a far better future than the one you fear and the one the chosen media wishes to feed you.
    It’s time to believe and it’s time to grow strong.
    My point, my belief and my entitlement to say so, without expletives.
    I wonder how you people will vote in the future? I’m glad people have finally seen what politics is when you take a deeper look. I’d suggest you do get involved and hold your MP’s to account. They seriously have messed up looking after our assets, our NHS, our schools, our jobs, our retirement considering they are the jobs they are employed to do. This has been getting worse way before Brexit ever came along.
    We need to pull together fast because all the hot air is not going to resolve anything and action needs to be taken in the future with positive outlooks and real prospects. I’m only going to promote optimism. I have really had enough of constant bickering, arguing, hostility and anger. It is system driven and extremely distracting. It really is time to focus on what confronts us and how we can get involved in that and make the future ours collectively.

    March 31, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    • Derick Tulloch

      With respect, the UK is not “a country”. It is a Union of three countries, and part of a fourth. Currently joined together by two international treaties. The Treaty of Union between England & Wales, and Scotland, in 1707.

      And the Union of 1800 when Ireland joined the 1707 Union.

      As we see with Brexit, signatories to international treaties can withdraw.

      April 2, 2017 at 9:11 am
  • Waldo Bendini

    You fuckwit, you have not got a clue.

    March 31, 2017 at 7:02 pm
    • Emma

      Oof, and there you are again. Same sentiment, slightly different words. Showing an enviable level of linguistic versatility there, Waldo. Keep it coming. You never know, you might manage to squeeze out a haiku one day.

      March 31, 2017 at 8:08 pm
  • Waldo Bendini

    You stupid ignorant twat. You have no idea

    March 31, 2017 at 7:03 pm
  • Martin

    We live in a great country. We shall struggle on and one day the remainers and the leavers will be friends again..negotiating the exit will take time and patience, but there’s one thing that’s sure. There is no turning back now , so I’m going to make the best of it ! I love my country of birth. I Also very much enjoy travelling Europe and the world …I’m going to enjoy the years ahead . I don’t think they will be too bad….hopefully rather good !

    March 31, 2017 at 9:30 pm
  • Chris Owen

    The whole Schmexit Referendum mess was a farrago of goofs and travesties. No sensible setting of the bar (60% minimum for such a big constitutional change surely, but Cameron didn’t think he’d lose, so why bother with such details eh!)
    As Emma pointed out, the simplistic two-box ballot paper in no way captured the complexity of the “territory” (it was like putting a map of Venice on the back of a fag packet). It’s blindingly obvious, from her fickleness, that Theresa May doesn’t give a shit one way or the other about the EU; it’s just a political game, same as it was for Cameron. They won’t be personally that put out if the economy struggles. Her main concern is to get something wrapped up that she can spin as a success in good time for 2020’s General Election (hence the rush). But don’t worry, Dante’s original manuscripts included some unpublished descriptions of a special ring on Hell for Brexit politicians. They are portrayed being skinned by devils and having their innards replaced from the arsehole upwards by genuine German sausage meat. Turn them over! They’re done!

    March 31, 2017 at 10:46 pm
  • DevilsAdvocate

    One of the complaints I heard about the EU, was the un-elected top officials often used bully boy tactics or outright threats towards anyone that had a different opinion or asked too many questions.

    Do you really think they were ever going to stop ? Even now they continue to employ such rhetoric…

    In an extraordinary speech the EU Commission president said he would push for Ohio and Texas to split from the rest of America if the Republican president does not change his tune and become more supportive of the EU.

    March 31, 2017 at 11:11 pm
  • Rowland Davies

    You have written a brilliant article, Emma. Thank you very much for it.

    I am older than baby boomers (72½) and a very firm believer in remaining in the EU but am not taking offense at the references to BBs as having been the ones who mainly voted to leave. I personally know old people who only see immigrants when they go to hospital but are incensed about immigration. I know old people who believe that EU policy is decided by the Board of BMW and that we will therefore get a brilliant deal on leaving the EU. I know old people (and many younger ones) who are still fighting World War II and whose sense of history stopped shortly before the beginning of World War I.

    It makes me very sad indeed that so few of the older generation are worried about the loss of opportunity for young people. I know how hard it was to get work on the Continent before we joined the EU (or even get a currency allowance to go there!)and I don’t want to go back to those dark days.

    April 1, 2017 at 2:18 pm
  • Lisa

    Thank you so much for this. I’m one of those “Europeans” who is getting royally fucked by Brexit. I’ve lived in the UK for 11 years. I left in June to go to Canada for a while, where my family is. My mother got diagnoses with cancer in August, so it wasn’t a question that I would stay in Canada to be with her through her treatment (which just finished, and she’s doing great and most likely cancer-free, knock on wood). I’ve been out of the UK for more than 6 months, which makes my automatic ‘permanent residency’ status null and void. Granted, I did apply for permanent residency, last year, well before Brexit, as a precaution, and am one of the people-who-have-lived-in-the-UK-for-many-years-with-a-European-passport who got refused. For no good reason. In spite of having lived in the UK consistently for over 6 years in one stint, and not having been out of the country for more than the 450 in total, as per the permanent residency rule. My life was in the UK, my friends, everything (I’m a self-employed photographer, so not tied to a company in the UK, but my entire profession was built there). I now have to build a new life, and figure out a new future. It makes me want to screeeeeeam (and, I’m being tested for an ulcer. No idea if it’s related to stress, but I didn’t feel this permanent punched-in-the-gut feeling pre-Brexit (and we can add trump in there too). Anyway, i don’t mean to whine, I just wanted to say THANK YOU for writing this!!!! And the swear words hell. This is a really shitty situation. And it F***-ing SUCKS.

    April 1, 2017 at 3:54 pm
  • Philip Ogley

    The best piece written about Brexit since, well, Brexit! Excellent!

    April 1, 2017 at 6:07 pm
  • SteveK

    Hi Emma. Totally agree with your piece. However, I note all the comments from ‘baby-boomers’ (I am one)… it is illustrative of the readership of your article: The baby boomers are the ones reading and commenting, much like they are the ones who got off their arses and voted (for good or bad).
    I guess I am trying to say that we do care, perhaps as evidenced, more-so than younger generations.

    April 2, 2017 at 1:37 pm
  • Neil

    ahh diddums, snowflake didn’t get what they wanted
    fascist

    April 2, 2017 at 3:03 pm
    • Emma

      Funny how the most abusive leavers are always anonymous, isn’t it?

      April 2, 2017 at 4:22 pm
      • Neil

        Not anonymous, left email address.

        Hope all you whining twats bugger off, we had a vote, the nation has spoken. Just because you don’t like the vote it matters not a jot, we’re out!

        But feel free to carry on bleating about it; it won’t make one iota difference. My football team lost today, I think the game should be replayed and I’m going to have an aneurysm about it just to prove what a spoilt brat I really am.

        April 2, 2017 at 7:14 pm
  • Julian

    confused, clicked on the “find out more” link and Emma Clarke does voice overs, so did Emma Clarke Write this or is this a voiceover for an organization?

    April 2, 2017 at 4:17 pm
  • Peter

    I was once really OK with being a born and bred British citizen. Happier still when I became British and European. But now…I’m disgusted by the small-minded xenophobic decision that’s been made on my behalf. I will remain a European even if it means me having to give up my British passport. The British have this smug idea that they are much cooler than the rest of Europe, but viewed from the outside Britain doesn’t look cool at all now…anything but.

    April 2, 2017 at 10:56 pm
  • Andrew Duncan

    Hi Emma,

    Fully agree. Just one thing I haven’t yet read about: I´m a 58 year old “British citizen” living in Spain for 57 years and with no right to vote in the Referendum penalised for not being resident in the right place. I gather I am not the only one in this situation. I wonder if a 2% difference in the final result could have changed if we “second class Brits” would have been allowed to vote in the Referendum.

    April 3, 2017 at 8:59 am
  • David Whelan

    Andrew Duncan, you’ve been in Spain too long buddy, you’re out of touch with your home nation.

    Question – After 57 years, why haven’t you taken Spanish citizenship. Then you could stay as long as you like? Is it that NHS health and pension benefits?

    April 3, 2017 at 11:11 am
    • Andrew Duncan

      Dear David Whelan,

      Thank you for your advise. And no worries, I have never claimed, nor will I claim any NHS or pension benefits in the UK. There is an excellent free National Health System in Spain (following the old NHS standards).

      Still, just to get back too my point that doesn´t mean I shouldn’t feel entitled to have had the right to vote in the EU Referendum -together with thousands of UK citizens residing in the EU.

      April 4, 2017 at 12:25 pm
  • Mark Heeley

    Except the electorate DID know what the consequences of Leaving would be and why only 2 choices were needed at the ballot box. The UK Government sent this to EVERY household in the nation, and there was a whole section titled ‘What happens if we leave?’.

    So the UK demos know what they were voting for. It’s those who voted Remain who cannot accept the result who have now resorted to expressing their anger through expletives, unable to reconcile why the result is as it is.

    Campaign for a type of Brexit, but not to reverse the decision of the Referendum. The UK had the information to make a choice, now that choice has been made.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/why-the-government-believes-that-voting-to-remain-in-the-european-union-is-the-best-decision-for-the-uk/why-the-government-believes-that-voting-to-remain-in-the-european-union-is-the-best-decision-for-the-uk

    April 3, 2017 at 12:04 pm
    • Emma

      Was there anything on the ballot paper about leaving the Customs Union? The Northern Irish peace agreement being jeopardised? Potentially losing our EU Citizens rights?? What would happen to UK nationals living abroad?? Gibraltar? The possibility of the breakup of the UK?? No?? Gosh.

      April 3, 2017 at 12:08 pm
      • Tess Tickles

        The vote as far as most of us were concerned was to LEAVE or STAY, not to leave bits of it or keep bit’s we liked, I voted to leave full stop.

        September 19, 2017 at 3:16 pm
        • Emma

          That kind of simplistic, nonsensical, chromatic, naive thinking is exactly why we’re in this mess now. Brexit’s not going too well now, is it?

          (By the way, it’s *bits*).

          September 19, 2017 at 3:20 pm
  • Grace

    For goodness’ sake, Baby Boomers on this thread, the fact that you feel the need to blatantly advertise how you’re not like the Boomers she’s describing, as well as post whatever moral resume you feel necessary to drive the point home…all of that is infuriating because still – STILL, you refuse to admit you are part of the problem, whether you actually want to be or not. I don’t like all of the characteristics or generalizations about millennials but I can’t deny that I am one because that’s the generation I was born into and obviously I carry some of the broader traits. Each generation is messed up in their own ways. Admit it, we’ll forgive you, we’ll all move on. Please! And thanks.

    April 4, 2017 at 3:18 am
  • steve

    I accept that people are allowed their opinion in all things, in offering their opinion they should also accept that others can also have their opinion even if it the opposite of your own. I think it is totally unrealistic to put forward the notion that the voters did not know what they were voting for and to to suggest that the supporters of Brexit are the only ones who did not know what they were voting for is ludicrous, it follows the Remain camp were equally uninformed or misled.

    Democracy needs to be respected even though it is a bitter pill for the likes of Emma and others, it may have been equally bitter for the Brexiteers had it gone the other way. It is also pointless to argue that certain parts of the country, Scotland, N. Ireland, London, even voted in such a way that it is unfair on the remainder. When we have a general election we have to or at least ought to accept the democratic vote is just what it is. Tory voters accept it when Labour win and vice versa so the same should hold in this vote and geography is not a consideration, although the Scots are being encouraged to belive differently.

    I think the next two years are going to be made unbearably painful by the Remain camp continually peddling fear and fake news about what is being or to be negotiated as will the press and general media. If the population will accept the vote they should put all of their energies into supporting the negotiating teams to bring back the most positive deal they can make. It is a given that we will be unable to achieve every single detail in our favour and we should not expect that nor should that be allowed to scupper what is achieved. The EU will take more notice of our negotiating position if they see the UK public behind their government in arriving at the final deal.

    Politicians the world over with equal measure in the EU and the UK show little if any degree of skill in anything they do in recent years except when it comes to arriving at their own salaries and expenses so we should not expect miracles here. The EU team are likely to be as guilty as our own team in being compromised by their own ego’s in all of this but I fervently hope that there will be some sensible negotiators involved on both sides, actually trying to arrive at a fair and just deal for the public on both sides. The public in much of the EU and certainly the UK have lost faith in their politicans and what they actually do for their citizens. I hope this historical event will be a change in that.

    I hope that both sides in the UK will now just focus on negotiating us as good a deal as they can and then we exit from a totally fraudulent EU where billions of euros are squandered every day by the elite that runs it. If they had administered it properly in the first place we would not be considering leaving and nor would others but they cling to the wreckage of an unworkable idea that keeps getting sidetracked into things it should not involve itself in e g Federal Europe. Accept it or not but Germany runs the club, they do the best out of everyone in the EU because they wield the power. They will not want us to go and will make it difficult if they can but it is time to leave as this club is on the brink of collapse because of its own shortcomings and we do well to leave before it sinks.

    So Emma let us be more even handed in our judgement, accept the democracy of the vote and the sanity of the voters on all sides, and allow the negotiations to be conducted so that we all get the best deal we can.

    Steve

    April 9, 2017 at 11:04 am
    • Emma

      We voted without knowing what Leaving meant, and we have no way of knowing what it means until the negotiations are completed. For this reason, I suggest Parliament should have a say on whether we Brexit and if we do, on what terms. This, surely, for anyone who cares about democracy, is fair for everyone – including the 16 million+ voters who are presumably who you’re talking about when you say “the likes of Emma.”

      April 10, 2017 at 9:13 am
  • T Ward

    Tim.
    How to sell the country out in on easy lesson, Brexit it.
    Sounds like history repeating itself. Maggie did the same back in the 80s. Manufacturing goes abroad. For a country to prosper it needs to make things to sell. A service industry is NOT the same.

    April 20, 2017 at 9:03 pm
  • Karen Orton

    I am a baby boomer and I agree with everything you say. Personally, I think it was all planned to remove European protection and leave the way clear for some serious social regression.

    May 30, 2017 at 10:03 pm
  • Aaron saxton

    Author is brilliant. Why would the EU see the UK leave the EU and do better? What fucking genius thought that would happen? Why idiots that think experts are idiots. I personally like well trained people with years of experience on issues and education. But it appears you can feed garbage to 52% of the uk and they will buy it. Let’s visit this in 2 years and see how many britons think this was a good idea. Fucking morons who got played by claims that were disproven instantly – yet they wanted it to be true. Fucking idiots always buy into “it’s not your fault – it’s there fault those overlords in Brussels!!” For their lot in life – talking to half of them you think life in the uk in 1950 was a fucking Christmas party. Worse off now??? What ducking planet are they living on?

    June 12, 2017 at 5:18 am
  • Simon

    Can’t believe how we have been fucked over by the thick idiots who don’t like to think but like to be told what to think.
    Too many sun and mirror readers unfortunately.
    U.K. is fucked IMHO

    June 19, 2017 at 6:18 pm
    • Dom

      You’re an idiot. Save the oxygen for others.

      July 5, 2017 at 6:23 am
      • Emma

        And you sir, are rude and offensive.

        July 5, 2017 at 8:55 am
        • Tess Tickles

          For you to say someone is rude and offensive Emma is the pot calling the kettle black indeed, after that foul semi literate rant above.

          September 19, 2017 at 3:13 pm
          • Emma

            Hi Tess, thanks for taking the time to comment. You were warned in the first para about the foul language. If you’re offended by that, you really shouldn’t have read further. Unless you WANTED to be offended and then complain? Still, thanks for your time.
            Emma

            September 19, 2017 at 3:18 pm
  • Dom

    Very selective in your replies Emma. Breathtaking arrogance minus breathtaking stupidity equals a blog that clogs up google searches.

    July 5, 2017 at 6:22 am
  • Charles

    The most searched thing on Google the day after the referendum was ‘What’s the EU?’…that’s the level…A few days ago I watched a TV show about a small town in the UK. There’s a car factory in there where mostly of people of the town work. They massive voted to leave the EU and now the factory, which gives a lot of jobs, will shut down and move to another country. And I remember the campaign with the bus displaying that thing about the 350 millions for the NHS. What that politician didn’t tell you is that, after Brexit, a lot of expat living, for example, in Spain, will come back to the UK. Is the NHS ready to attend about 500000 more pensioners with less nurses and doctors? Britain for the british? ENJOY IT!!

    July 12, 2017 at 7:27 pm
  • Phil

    Perhaps the situation could be brought to a swift and satisfying conclusion if those brexiteers who are so keen to jump of the cliff edge into oblivion did it NOW, off a real cliff, and save the rest of us from imminent and certain hardship. I do not believe for one moment
    that whatever benefits may arise from leaving the EU (and I am sure no
    one can convincingly make a case for any) they will have any positive impact on the general population. The economic and political consequences of this utter folly will rumble on to the detriment of the common people for years. And no doubt we will be picking up the tab just to add insult to injury.

    July 29, 2017 at 4:43 pm
  • Garry C

    Bloody glad I move to France five years ago registered and working in the system – as elequantly said GB has fucked itself! My is wife robbed of six years pention and many other reasons I’m glad I’m / we’re out. Imploding quickly – I don’t know but its not heading in a good direction.

    August 3, 2017 at 9:39 pm
  • Winston Churchill

    I thoroughly and utterly enjoyed reading this and the comments, I find it totally just and deserved that you all finally feel so strongly and angry about it all, the longer the better. The fact you all feel this way is a long over due honor to those that sacrificed so much in our countries past wars and won so much, and achieved so much only to produce cowardly and weakened lacks of character and appreciation in people such as yourselves with rediculous views of utopia and liberalism without any real freedom.

    August 10, 2017 at 12:49 am
  • Peter Holce

    A meaningless rant from a sore loser. Move on.

    August 11, 2017 at 8:22 am
  • Susan Jones

    If it’s not broke don’t waste time mending it I AGREE SueX

    September 20, 2017 at 9:56 am
  • Logan

    Brexit was inevitable either now or at a future date. Why? because the EU is a proven failed political construct. The prime directive of the EU is a totalitarian superstate and if you had done your research properly would know this. Cameron said no further integration and no Euro. You only had to listen to Juncker’s speech to prove the deception, lies and misinformation during the referendum.

    Peace in Europe has nothing to do with the EU and it did not stop the war in the 90’s. Now with proposed EU army (Denied by Clegg and Co) and the provocation of the Russian borders, nothing could be further from the truth. Europe and the EU are not the same! One is a collection of amazing countries and beautiful people with there unique cultures, qualities and collective consciousness which is being systematically eroded by the EU, the other is an undemocratic dictatorial political project which is becoming the new communist block. Why do so many people here think the EU is a good idea? There is nothing wrong with the concept of an independent sovereign country with its own democratic government creating its own laws and looking after its people working with other countries around the world. There are 168 countries not in the EU! it’s not a great problem to visit them with visa’s or study in them if you wish.

    The EU is a divisive and destructive proven failure causing more problems than it solves. Case in point, the Irish border problem could easily be fixed by Ireland also leaving. The EU is only surviving by printing 60 Billion Euro’s a month (Also known as QE or kicking the can down the road). It has destroyed most economies (Apart from Germany – No Suprise!) by removing the necessary financial mechanisms of control and the Euro will only survive by total enforced integration as quoted by Mervin King the ex-governor of the Bank of England. The idea that a sovereign democratic country with its own laws and abilities to be in control is a bad idea, as opposed to a dictatorial Orwellian nightmare in the making forcing decisions with little opposition defies all logic. Try selling that concept to America where Canada, Mexico and South American countries share a common currency and take political decisions from an unelected commission, I don’t think so!

    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
    Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher (1788 – 1860)

    October 11, 2017 at 9:43 am
    • Emma

      “Case in point, the Irish border problem could easily be fixed by Ireland also leaving.”

      Easily fixed.

      *headdesk*

      It’s this kind of broad brush-stroke, simplistic thinking that’s created this bloody mess. And it is a mess, isn’t it?

      Wonder if the government will be compelled to finally publish its documents outlining the economic impact of Brexit? Because that’d only be fair, wouldn’t it? That’d be democratic. But so far it’s resisted. And you have to wonder why, eh?

      October 11, 2017 at 10:29 am
      • Logan

        No, what created this bloody mess was the deceit and lies of the EU in the first place. The EEC was a reasonable concept in the beginning but because this monstrous basket case of an organisation which with each successive treaty tries to create its superstate, regardless whether people wanted it or not marches on. If was a tariff-free trading club there would not be the problems it has created in its incessant drive for power. My point about Ireland was a simple example of the unnecessary and stupid rules of this failing organisation.

        I noticed you did not pick up on the other points or explain why you don’t like the idea of nation states working together or why you think living in a totalitarian state is good?

        We now have to look forward to Catalonia/Spain, the imminent further collapse of the Greek economy, Italian banks, Eurozone, migration etc etc. Yes the EU is doing a wonderful job! The point is the world or at least Europe would be a better place without the EU. Why most analysis of the economy post-Bexit is going to difficult because you are unable to factor in the global trade calculations because the EU outrageously forbids you to set up trade deals whilst we are unfortunately still a member of this sad protectionist club. Think about that! Power and control abuse of nations.

        I have no doubt the world will eventually integrate totally with a universal digital currency and world government with the assistance of AI as most politicians are too stupid to achieve this. This can happen with nation states each helping develop an economic level playing field of GDB which will seamlessly fit together. However, it’s not going to happen using the model of the EU which is not going to be around in the future an will suffer the same consequences as the Soviet Union.

        October 11, 2017 at 5:37 pm
  • Emma

    Logan, I really appreciate your comment but honestly, there’s so much I could say in response but you know: no time.

    Quickly though:

    “I noticed you did not pick up on the other points or explain why you don’t like the idea of nation states working together or why you think living in a totalitarian state is good?”

    The whole POINT of the EU is nation states working together. With the maniac Tr*mp in the White House, it’s arguably never been more imperative that the EU works together.

    Why have you assumed I think living in a totalitarian state is good? That’s just crackers talk.

    There’s a lot wrong with the EU. Don’t assume I’m blind to its frailties.

    Anyway, I now have to go and make dinner for my family. You have yourself a good evening.

    October 11, 2017 at 5:45 pm
  • Logan

    Appreciate your sentiment and I wish I could see the EU working with nation states but after following the European Parliament for some time listening to Guy Verhofstadt and Juncker’s vision I’m afraid I can’t come to any other conclusion that it is the wrong choice for the UK. I’ll agree to disagree. Best Wishes

    October 11, 2017 at 10:10 pm
  • Joe

    Everything you said is a total brilliants, we couldn’t say it any better. Brexit is mainly older generation thinking, and believe UK will become a rulers like before, that’s total crap and UK is a superpower with EU. Brexit is the downfall of UK. Russian and China celebrated this split, and also USA President Trump love it too because he was jealous of UK strong economy and currency our strong £. Brexit has not only ruined UK economy it is weaken our £

    October 12, 2017 at 1:23 pm
  • mark north

    Brexit has nothing to do with the economic downturn , George Osbourns austerity caused this completely and probably made more people want out of the eu,and why wouldn’t they the eu wasn’t working for their low paid unequal lives! People have no money because of this and nothing to do with brexit ,knock on effect right to the top , people don’t spend because of austerity ,government don’t collect taxes , deficit don’t get paid simple. the government just went too far with cuts this time. austerity did not work before and it wont work now.At the end of the day our government, the media, tabloids are corrupt. we have voted out whether that be right or wrong lets just get on with it instead of drawing it out as long as they possibly can like spoiled kids that dont want to do what they have been told to do . one sided debates on the bbc clearly .The government must think most of us were born last thursday.

    October 18, 2017 at 3:08 am
  • Patsy

    I am 64 and myself, husband and all my friends voted to Remain, we all shed a few years the day after ref. I feel it must decide along education lines, despite working class origins I ended up as uni tutor, my brother never left home town is poorly educated and voted to leave. Our 93 year old father voted to remain, as he remembers the nationalism in Europe prior to the war and where that led, He is as bitterly disappointed as me.

    October 19, 2017 at 10:12 am
  • Andrew

    I didn’t read every comment but read the main blog article. Fully agree with everything said and have no idea how to address #Brexit. We have an unelected Prime Minister (she inherited it and then lost it at a general election) who triggered article 50 without consulting anyone. Why is it that an “advisory” referendum that had less than a 2% majority can mess it up for future generations with no possibility of changing or even challenging the outcome.
    Brexit means Brexit my arse!

    November 18, 2017 at 11:57 pm
  • ted

    why keep going on about it you morons we are leaving get used to it and shut the fuck up

    November 22, 2017 at 3:01 pm
  • ted

    I am just carnt get away with moaning pricks you get one life get on with it and stop moaning there are people in this world a lot worse than any one on here so stop bitching you whining twat

    November 27, 2017 at 3:24 pm
  • ted

    I know but it keeps you amused don’t it only do it to wind you up

    November 28, 2017 at 5:46 pm
  • ted

    oh bye for now

    November 28, 2017 at 5:47 pm
  • ted

    be back tomorrow

    November 28, 2017 at 5:47 pm

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