Blog

Welcome to Emma Clarke’s global soapbox – the antidote to modern living, encapsulated in a series of freewheeling rants.

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“when it comes to…”

How many times have you heard these immortal words in a commercial? And what does it MEAN?
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the truth about working alone

Emma explains the pitfalls of being a lone worker – and how sharing her space has changed her life.
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how to cast the best voiceover for your radio ad

Emma wrote this article for utalkmarketing.com. In it, she gives some basic pointers to help ensure your ad doesn’t sound rubbish because you hired the wrong voice.
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my sedentary lifestyle

The life of a voiceover involves lots of sitting down. Emma fears it’s turning her into a lardbucket.
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“could you do it in the style of the m & s food commercials?”

An overview of the M & S food campaign’s appeal and why a ‘borrowed’ style might not be such a good creative choice for a roofing company’s radio ad.
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the two women talking sketch

Emma investigates the all-too-common phenomenon of the ‘two women talking sketch’ found in radio commercials.
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voxpops – why sounding normal is so very hard…

Voiceovers are often asked to sound like real people. But how real does the client really want it? Emma examines the subtle art of acting like a normal human being.
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Secretly, I want to be a local radio newsreader…

Emma explains why she so admires the unique vocal style of local radio newsreaders in a homage to their special talents. Have a listen to her podast ‘audition’ – do you think she has a future as a radio newsreader??
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Some of Emma’s clients

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“The perfect delivery. Every single time. Guaranteed. And always up for a brew and some cake.”
Chris Stevens, director, Devaweb
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“Emma is the best. I have no hesitation in recommending her for any voice over – she can handle anything.”
Mike Wyer, BBC